student

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Juan Ramon Guerrero was a homebody and student who’d recently come out to his family. Luis Vielma reportedly worked on a “Harry Potter” ride at Universal Studios. Stanley Almodovar III was a cheery pharmacy technician from Massachusetts. Kimberly “KJ” Morris was a bouncer with an independent streak.

All four were at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, that became the scene of the country’s worst mass shooting in recent history. They were among the 45 of the 49 victims identified by authorities by early Monday. The fatalities included:

  • Edward Sotomayor Jr., 34.
  • Stanley Almodovar III, 23.
  • Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo, 20.
  • Juan Ramon Guerrero, 22.
  • Eric Ivan Ortiz-Rivera, 36.
  • Peter O. Gonzalez-Cruz, 22.
  • Luis S. Vielma, 22.
  • Kimberly Morris, 37.
  • Eddie Jamoldroy Justice, 30.
  • Darryl Roman Burt II, 29.
  • Deonka Deidra Drayton, 32.
  • Alejandro Barrios Martinez, 21.
  • Anthony Luis Laureanodisla, 25.

  • Jean Carlos Mendez Perez, 35.

  • Franky Jimmy Dejesus Velazquez, 50.

  • Amanda Alvear, 25.

  • Martin Benitez Torres, 33.

  • Luis Daniel Wilson-Leon, 37.

  • Mercedez Marisol Flores, 26.

  • Xavier Emmanuel Serrano Rosado, 35.

  • Gilberto Ramon Silva Menendez, 25.

  • Simon Adrian Carrillo Fernandez, 31.
  • Oscar A. Aracena-Montero, 26.
  • Enrique L. Rios, Jr., 25.
  • Miguel Angel Honorato, 30.
  • Javier Jorge-Reyes, 40.
  • Joel Rayon Paniagua, 32.

  • Jason Benjamin Josaphat, 19.

  • Cory James Connell, 21.

  • Juan P. Rivera Velazquez, 37.

  • Luis Daniel Conde, 39.

  • Shane Evan Tomlinson, 33.

  • Juan Chevez-Martinez, 25.

  • Jerald Arthur Wright, 31.

  • Leroy Valentin Fernandez, 25.

  • Tevin Eugene Crosby, 25.

  • Jonathan Antonio Camuy Vega, 24.

  • Jean C. Nives Rodriguez, 27.

  • Rodolfo Ayala-Ayala, 33.

  • Brenda Lee Marquez McCool, 49.

  • Yilmary Rodriguez Sulivan, 24.

  • Christopher Andrew Leinonen, 32.

  • Angel L. Candelario-Padro, 28.

  • Frank Hernandez, 27.

  • Paul Terrell Henry, 41.

Dozens of vigils were being held across the country. By early Monday, more than $1.3 million had been raised by a local LGBT group, Equality Florida, for victims and their families.

Friends and relatives were still struggling to make sense of what happened.

“Completely in shock,” a friend of Almodovar’s wrote on his Facebook page. “I can’t believe you are one of the victims.”

Another recalled how Almodovar always “[b]rought a smile to my face every time I was down. It’s going to be hard walking into work and not seeing you bounce around like you always do.”

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Story highlights

  • UCLA student body president says Professor William S. Klug was killed
  • University says classes are expected to resume Thursday
  • University officials say they will review all campus safety procedures
UCLA Student Body President Michael Skiles identifiedProfessor William S. Klug as the individual who was slain.
Klug is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, according to the UCLA’s website. He received his undergraduate degree at Westmont College, then obtained a Masters at UCLA and a Ph.D. Caltech.
He also led the Klug Research Group, which studied “problems at the interface of mechanics and biology.”
“We aim to understand how the physical properties of biological structures and materials are involved in biological function from molecular and cellular scales upward,” the group’s website says.
The situation was contained by shortly after noon, and there was no ongoing threat to to the campus, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck said. He said police found a weapon, and no suspects remain at large.
UCLA said classes were canceled for the rest of Wednesday, but are expected to resume Thursday, except for the engineering school, where the death occurred. Classes there will resume Monday, officials said.
Beck said the shooting took place in a small office in the engineering building. He said he did not know whether the dead were students.
Authorities had received reports of an active shooter in or near the building, Los Angeles Police Officer Tony Im said.
Officials put the campus on lockdown as authorities investigated. Throngs of police with long guns patrolled the streets of the campus of more than 40,000 students.
SWAT officers and dozens of squad cars filled the area as police tried to clear campus buildings floor by floor.
Police respond to the shooting at UCLA

Police respond to the shooting at UCLA

Freshman Teddi Mattox said she was in a cafeteria getting breakfast with about 100 other students when the shooting occurred.
“We got the alert and a woman said, ‘This is not a joke, everyone get to the back of the dining hall because we have to stay away from the windows,'” she said.
“We’re crowded back here, we’ve been here for at least an hour and a half. People are crying, they’re nervous, they’re shaking … I have not stopped shaking for the last hour and a half.”
UCLA officials said they will review all campus safety procedures.
“We’re pleased in the way notification went out, troubled by some reports of unlocked doors, but we want to review everything,” said Scott Waugh, UCLA’s executive vice chancellor and provost.
UCLA has also extended counseling services over the next few days to serve all the students who may be in need, Waugh said.
Los Angeles police is still investigating the shooting, according to university officials.
Police urged residents to avoid the UCLA campus.
CNN law enforcement analyst Tom Fuentes said locking down a large university in an urban area is a “monumental task.” UCLA’s engineering building is in the middle of a very densely populated part of Los Angeles.
UCLA’s final exams are scheduled for next week, with graduation set for Friday.
The engineering school’s senior class dinner was scheduled for Thursday night.
According to UCLA, the school is known as the “birthplace of the Internet” because in 1969, the first transmission on what would become the Internet was sent from the engineering school’s Boelter Hall.

CNN’s Artemis Moshtaghian, Amanda Wills and Stella Chan contributed to this report.

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North Korea sentenced a U.S. college student to 15 years hard labor for what it called hostile acts against the country, further chilling relations with the U.S. as the Obama administration seeks to ratchet up pressure on the regime over its nuclear arms program.

North Korea’s Supreme Court issued the sentence on Wednesday against Otto Frederick Warmbier, a student at the University of Virginia, the country’s official Korean Central News Agency said. Warmbier entered North Korea as a tourist in late December and took down a propaganda sign in Pyongyang so he could exchange it for money outside the country, KCNA reported in late February.

The sentencing comes as the U.S. is conducting annual military exercises with South Korea, which North Korea has denounced as a dress rehearsal for war. Early this month the United Nations Security Council tightened sanctions on North Korea, imposing a ban on exports of certain minerals — a key source of hard currency for the Kim Jong Un regime — over its fourth nuclear test in January and a long-range rocket launch weeks later.

North Korea has detained and convicted U.S. nationals as a way to draw prominent American figures such as former U.S. President Jimmy Carter into Pyongyang as mediators to open negotiations with Washington. The U.S.’s efforts to help Warmbier are complicated by having no diplomatic relations with North Korea. Instead, it maintains contact through the Swedish embassy in Pyongyang.

Tension remains high along the border between North Korea and South Korea after the nuclear test. On Tuesday KCNA quoted North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as saying his country would soon conduct another test. His threat comes ahead of a global nuclear security summit to be hosted by U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington later this month.

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Reaction from Fox News national security analyst KT McFarland

 

An American student from Vanderbilt University was stabbed to death in one of three bloody terror attacks that  rocked Israel Tuesday, just as Vice President Biden arrived in Tel Aviv to meet with leaders in an effort to stem Palestinian violence and mend frayed relations with the Jewish state.

The chancellor of Vanderbilt University, Nicholas S. Zeppos, identified the student as Taylor Force, who attended the Owen Graduate School of Management.

“Taylor embarked on this trip to expand his understanding of global entrepreneurship and also to share his insights and knowledge with start-ups in Israel,” Zeppos said in a statement.

“He exemplified the spirit of discovery, learning and service that is the hallmark of our wonderful Owen community. This horrific act of violence has robbed our Vanderbilt family of a young hopeful life and all of the bright promise that he held for bettering our greater world.”

Palestinian attackers shot and stabbed a dozen policemen and civilians in separate assaults around Israel, continuing near-daily incidents that began in October and have left more than 200 Israelis and Palestinians dead. Two Israeli police officers and 10 civilians were wounded in the attacks and three Palestinian attackers were killed.

Part of Biden’s mission is to smooth over the latest bump in relations between the Obama White House and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu after a public falling out over the Iran nuclear deal last year. Biden will meet with Netanyahu in Jerusalem on Wednesday to discuss military aid, a session that comes on the heels of the prime minister canceling a trip to Washington.

His office issued a statement later condemning the attack in “strongest possible terms.”

As if to underscore the continuing problem of Palestinian violence, which has surged since the so-called “knife intifada” began in Jerusalem last fall, a Palestinian opened fire at police near Jerusalem’s Old City an hour before his plane touched down. One police officer was reportedly shot in the head in the attack, and another hurt as the assailant was chased down and kileld.

Then, after Biden arrived in Tel Aviv, 10 Israelis were stabbed in the city’s Jaffa port section, Reuters reported. A BBC reporter tweeted that Biden was a few hundred meters from the attack.

The wife of the American student who died in the attack was one of five seriously injured.

The suspect, who was not immediately identified, was “neutralized,” authorities said.

Both incidents unfolded after a dramatic stabbing attack in the town of Petah Tikva, 20 miles east of Tel Aviv. The Israeli victim managed to pull the knife from his own neck and stab the Palestinian attacker, subduing him, The Times of Israel reports.

The victim had been collecting money for charity at the time, the newspaper adds.

It was the latest in a wave of Palestinian attacks that have killed 28 Israelis, mostly in shootings, stabbings and assaults with cars. At least 174 Palestinians were killed by Israeli fire during that time. Most were attackers and the rest were killed in clashes, Israel says.

Palestinians say the violence stems from frustration at nearly five decades of Israeli rule over the West Bank and east Jerusalem. Israel says the violence is fueled by a campaign of Palestinian lies and incitement that is compounded on social media sites that glorify attacks.

The White House said Israel had proposed two dates for a meeting between the leaders and the U.S. had offered to meet on one of those days. “We were looking forward to hosting the bilateral meeting,” said Ned Price, a spokesman for the White House’s National Security Council. “We were surprised to first learn via media reports that the prime minister, rather than accept our invitation, opted to cancel his visit.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report

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A photo of the slide was posted online by a UH doctoral student, with a full copy later appearing at Inside Higher Ed:

The slide was written by Jonathan Snow, an earth science professor and the president of the faculty senate. Snow told Inside Higher Ed the slide was intended to encapsulate the danger to academic freedom posed by the new law.

“The intrusion of gun culture onto campus inevitably harms the academic enterprise in a myriad of ways,” he said. Maria Gonzalez, an English professor, expressed a similar fear that a “volatile” student in her class could snap and resort to violence during a lecture on Marxist or queer theory.

While the recommendations were created by the faculty senate, UH administrators were quick to point out the guidelines were not endorsed by the university itself.

Despite the faculty senate’s fears, it’s not clear legalizing campus carry will drastically increase the danger posed to professors. Campus carry is already legal in several states, including Colorado and Utah, but there has been no spate of faculty assassinations attributable to them.

The slideshow is just the latest example of faculty expressing their widespread opposition to the new law. Hundreds of faculty at the University of Texas have signed a petition against the new law, and one of them has even blamed the law for his decision to accept a new academic position with the University of Sydney.

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BLACKSBURG — The Virginia Tech student charged with killing teen Nicole Madison Lovell knew the girl and an investigation shows that he used that relationship to abduct her before disposing of her body with the assistance of another Tech student, police said Sunday.

Blacksburg police announced the second Tech student’s arrest, one day after Tech freshman David Edmond Eisenhauer, 18, of Columbia, Maryland, was arrested and charged with first-degree murder and abduction. Lovell’s remains were discovered Saturday in Surry County, North Carolina.

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A Cal State Long Beach student was among those killed in the Paris terrorist attacks, according to the university.Nohemi Gonzalez, a 23-year-old design student from the El Monte area, was part of an international exchange program at the Strate School of Design. She was dining with fellow Cal State Long Beach students at a Paris restaurant Friday night when she was killed, the university’s president said. The 16 other students studying in France have been reported safe.
————FOR THE RECORD
11:35 a.m.: An earlier version of this article reported Gonzalez’s age as 20. According to Cal State Long Beach officials, she was 23.————On Saturday, Gonzalez’s friends expressed their sorrow over her death.“Yesterday I lost the most important person in my life,” wrote Gonzalez’s boyfriend, Tim Mraz, on Instagram. “She was my best friend and she will always be my angel forever. I am lost for words. My prayers are with her family. Such a bright soul and the sweetest girl with a smile on her face.”He posted a photo of the two embracing. Weeks earlier, he had sent her birthday wishes and mentioned that they would see each other in December. “I’ve missed you so much and I wish I could be with you to celebrate in Paris.”Mraz and his family declined to speak to reporters Saturday as friends visited their Bellflower home. The events were too fresh, too painful, a neighbor said when exiting.Alejandra Gonzalez attended Whittier High School with Gonzalez and said the two were on the cross-country team. She said her friend had a strong work ethic but knew when to be lighthearted and smile.“She was kind to everyone — a remarkable and unforgettable person,” she told The Times. “The world lost such a beautiful shining light.”Many of Gonzalez’s friends took to Facebook to express their sorrow.“It crushes my soul that you’re gone but you were off being a free spirit like you’ve always been,” wrote Madeline Chavez.“I’m still trying to process this all but it’s just too much to take,” wrote Niran Jayasiri. “You were one of the most down to earth, cheerful, bubbly, helpful and honest people I knew.”“I swear …Read More

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COLUMBIA, Mo. — Hours after a wave of student and faculty protests over racial tensions led to the resignation of the president of the University of Missouri system on Monday, the chancellor of the campus here also announced that he would step down from that post.
The president, Timothy M. Wolfe, stepped down early Monday morning, and by late in the day, he was followed by the chancellor of the Columbia campus, R. Bowen Loftin.
Mr. Wolfe had grown increasingly isolated, with opposition to his leadership reaching a crescendo in the last few days. A graduate student, Jonathan Butler, has been holding a highly publicized hunger strike, saying he would not eat again until Mr. Wolfe was gone; the university’s student government on Monday demanded his ouster; and much of the faculty canceled classes for two days in favor of a teach-in focused on race relations.
Mr. Loftin told the university’s governing body, the Board of Curators, that he would move into a new role in research. “I have decided today that I will transition from the role of chancellor” effective at the end of this year, he said. Mr. Loftin, who came to Missouri from Texas A&M in 2013, will become director for research facility development, the university said in a statement.
It was the football team that delivered what might have been the fatal blow to the tenures of the two officials, when players announced on Saturday that they would refuse to play as long as Mr. Wolfe remained in office, and their head coach, Gary Pinkel, said he supported them. The prospect of a football strike drew national attention, and officials said that just forfeiting the team’s game next weekend against Brigham Young University would cost the university $1 million.

“That got the attention of the alumni and the board, along with a substantial penalty they would have been facing,” said United States Representative Lacy Clay, a Democrat who represents part of the St. Louis area. “That would have been a disaster for their recruiting of black athletes and of black students to the university.”
Mr. Wolfe announced his resignation just before meeting with the university’s governing body, the Board of Curators, on campus here, the flagship of the four-campus system. Mr. Loftin made his announcement during a meeting of the governing board …Read More

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Police at UC Merced shot and killed a male student Wednesday after he went on a stabbing rampage and wounded four people, authorities and campus officials said.Among the injured were two students and one staff member, the university said Wednesday afternoon. School officials attributed previous reports of five victims to an early, chaotic scene and said all of the injured were expected to survive.
The fourth victim was a 31-year-old employee with Artisan Construction who was working with two colleagues on a renovation project in the building where the attack began, the Merced Sun-Star reported.Interested in the stories shaping California? Sign up for the free Essential California newsletter >>
Artisan Chief Executive John Price told the Sun-Star that his son, Byron Price, heard what sounded like a fight in a classroom and when he opened the door to investigate, the assailant lunged at him.“It got the [attacker] outside the room, away from others,” Price told the Sun-Star.The attack began before 8 a.m. inside the Classroom and Office Building near the center of campus and spread outside the building before the suspect was killed by officers on a pedestrian bridge connecting the campus’ two halves, officials said.The campus was closed after the attack, and school officials have offered counseling to those who want it and shuttles to people who need transportation.“I can tell you that we’re really shocked and saddened by this,” said Lorena Anderson, a school spokeswoman.“We’re doing everything we can to contact family and parents to make sure everyone here is safe and secure.”Two of the victims were airlifted to hospitals and all were conscious, according to the school.Anderson said the crime scene included the building, “the whole center of campus,” and the pedestrian bridge across a canal that divides the campus in two.Officials said they were trying to determine a motive for the attacks. On Wednesday afternoon, Shayan Rostami, a 19-year-old freshman, read a text message from a classmate aloud as he walked with a group of friends to Lake Yosemite, near campus.“Dude, I’m shaking,” the message read, according to Rostami. “In a million years I never thought it would happen on our campus.”Lois Vincent, an 18-year-old freshman, looked around at the rustling oaks and …Read More

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Police at UC Merced shot and killed a male student Wednesday after he went on a stabbing rampage and wounded five people, including four other students, authorities said.The attack began before 8 a.m. inside the Classroom and Office Building near the center of campus and spread to outside the building before the man was killed by officers on a pedestrian bridge connecting the school’s two halves, campus officials said.
School officials closed the campus after the attack and have offered counseling to those who need it and shuttles for people who need transportation.“I can tell you that we’re really shocked and saddened by this,” said Lorena Anderson, a school spokeswoman.“We’re doing everything we can to contact family and parents to make sure everyone here is safe and secure.”
Among the victims was a 31-year-old employee with Artisan Construction, who was working with two colleagues on renovating a student waiting area inside the building where the attack began, the Merced Sun-Star reported.
The worker was Byron Price, son of Artisan CEO John Price, the paper reported. The executive told the Sun-Star his son heard a scuffle in a classroom that sounded like a fight and when he opened the door to investigate, the assailant lunged at him.“It got the (attacker) outside the room, away from others,” Price told the Sun-Star. His son is expected to survive, the paper reported.Two of the five victims were airlifted to hospitals and all were conscious, according to the school.Anderson said the crime scene included inside the building, “the whole center of campus,” and a pedestrian bridge connecting the school to its lower half where there’s food and parking.Daniel Garcia-Ceja was walking to class at UC Merced Wednesday morning and ran into a campus police barricade at the Scholars Lane bridge.Garcia-Ceja, 21, said that, according to friends who were in the area at the time, a person with a knife was shot and killed on the bridge. They said they saw the assailant coming at students with a knife.”Some of my friends wanted to cry. Some were upset. Some were in shock. It was insane to hear that this happened in general,” Garcia-Ceja said. “You know it’s happened at other universities, and you know schools have been through these …Read More

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