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CLEVELAND — The attack on police officers in Baton Rouge, La., cast a grim mood over the opening of the Republican National Convention here, as Donald J. Trump responded to the killings with a stark warning that the country was falling apart.

A string of shootings targeting police officers, as well as the recent killings of two black men by police officers in Minnesota and Louisiana, had already pushed gun violence and social unrest to the center of the presidential campaign. Mr. Trump has campaigned on the theme of “law and order” since the assassination this month of five police officers in Dallas, and he is likely to amplify that message in the coming days.

Within hours of the killings on Sunday, in which three law enforcement officers were fatally shot and several others were wounded, Mr. Trump declared that the nation had become a “divided crime scene” and said that the Islamic State was watching as Americans murdered police officers. After President Obama issued a call for calm, Mr. Trump jabbed on Twitter that Mr. Obama “doesn’t have a clue.”

The presumptive Republican presidential nominee has long battled criticism of his volcanic temper and questions about his temperament and readiness for the presidency, and it was unclear if a thunderous response to the shooting in Louisiana will help allay voters’ concerns. While Republicans often run on law-and-order themes, an indelicate approach could carry considerable danger at a moment of such unusual political instability.

In Cleveland, the killings of the police have set a tense atmosphere for the convention: Well before the bloodshed in Baton Rouge, organizers were preparing extensively for mass demonstrations and potential unrest.

“This has got everybody on edge,” said Tony Perkins, a former state legislator from Baton Rouge who is the leader of the Family Research Council, a conservative group. “The nation is in shock. If it were an isolated incident, probably not so much so, but this is the second in two weeks.”

Anxiety about security in Cleveland grew throughout the day on Sunday, as an official with a police union in the city urged Gov. John Kasich, a Republican, to enact restrictions on gun rights around the convention zone as an additional safety precaution. Mr. Kasich’s office rejected the idea as legally impossible.

Roger F. Villere Jr., the chairman of the Louisiana Republican Party, said word of the attack in Baton Rouge early Sunday had sent a shudder through the state’s delegation in Cleveland. Mr. Villere, whose party office is in Baton Rouge, said he had been attending church on Sunday morning in suburban Mayfield, Ohio, when text messages and phone calls began pouring into his phone.

Many members of the Louisiana delegation had close ties to law enforcement, Mr. Villere said, and they would seek to put together a memorial event or moment of prayer this week.

A sense of loyalty to law enforcement has pervaded the convention: On Saturday night and on Sunday in Cleveland’s Fourth Street district, restaurant patrons seated on the sidewalk repeatedly broke into applause for the phalanxes of police officers who filed down the street on foot and on bicycles.

And the convention was likely to begin with a trumpeting of support for police officers. Convention organizers said on Sunday that the theme of the first day, Monday, would be “Make America Safe Again.”

Jeff Larson, the convention’s chief executive, said in a news conference that a leading speaker would be Rudolph W. Giuliani, whom he described as “the law-and-order mayor of New York.”

Mr. Giuliani has been a forceful critic of the Black Lives Matter movement and has been outspoken in his defense of law enforcement practices over the last few weeks.

Graphic | In Preparation for Convention Protests, Half Of Cleveland’s Downtown Will Be Under Restrictions How the host cities are regulating protests and security zones around the convention centers.

Mr. Trump was not slated to speak until later in the week, but on Sunday he embraced even more tightly a dire message about social disorder.

After spending the first part of the day lobbing insults at his political rivals through social media, Mr. Trump abruptly shifted his posture after the attack in Baton Rouge, dropping his customary complaints about television news coverage and taunts directed at Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren.

In an afternoon message posted to Facebook, Mr. Trump expressed grief over the loss of life. Without elaborating, he said the violence stemmed from a national leadership vacuum.

“How many law enforcement and people have to die because of a lack of leadership in our country?” he said. “We demand law and order.”

After the release of a carefully worded statement, Mr. Trump shared words of hot anger on Twitter, saying that the country was “divided and out of control.”

In downtown Cleveland, security precautions were everywhere: Tall metal barriers lined the roads around the Quicken Loans Arena, where Mr. Trump was scheduled to receive the Republican nomination on Thursday. With only light afternoon traffic in the vicinity of the convention, police officers and Secret Service agents seemed on some corners to outnumber pedestrians.

The first protests on Sunday were relatively subdued. In one park in eastern Cleveland, about 100 protesters gathered — alongside nearly as many members of the media — from groups that included Black Lives Matter, Code Pink and a pro-Palestinian organization.

Cleveland has assigned about 500 police officers specifically to handle the convention, and it has brought in thousands more officers to help, from departments as distant as California and Texas.

But some local officials have expressed concern about the possibility of violence owing to Ohio’s open-carry gun laws. Though demonstrators and others in the convention district have been barred from possessing a range of items, including gas masks, there was no prohibition on the brandishing of firearms.

On Sunday, the president of Cleveland’s police union called for additional measures to protect the security of the event, and urged Mr. Kasich to suspend open-carry gun rights. The governor’s office said Mr. Kasich did not have “the power to arbitrarily suspend federal and state constitutional rights or state laws.”

There was little evidence of firearms around the convention center, though journalists swarmed a lone man, Steve Thacker, who wandered into Public Square, a few blocks away, with a semiautomatic rifle strapped to his back and a handgun at his side.

In addition to Mr. Giuliani, the Trump campaign and convention organizers have announced the names of several prominent convention speakers who were closely identified with law enforcement. Among them was David Clarke Jr., the sheriff of Milwaukee County, Wis., and an ardent advocate for gun rights, who will speak on Monday.

Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, who ran for the Republican presidential nomination on his own law-and-order message, was also scheduled to speak.

But in Baton Rouge, Woody Jenkins, the Trump campaign’s state chairman in Louisiana, said he was unsure how closely the national political debate would touch the community. Mr. Jenkins, a newspaper editor and local Republican leader, said he had seen a “tremendous outpouring of brotherhood” in Baton Rouge over the past few weeks, and little mention of the presidential race.

Mr. Trump’s “message of supporting law and order, I think, is a good one,” Mr. Jenkins said. “And I think the message of, ‘We want justice and peace,’ from a lot on the Democratic side — that’s good as well. Why can’t we have both?”

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ISTANBUL — Standing atop a bus outside his mansion in Istanbul on Saturday night, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, victorious after putting down a coup attempt by renegade factions of the military, told his followers, “We only bow to God.”

The symbolism was stark. The informal rally harked back to his days as an up-by-the-bootstraps populist and Islamist leader who often spoke from the tops of buses. And his message, cloaked in the language of Islam, underscored how much Turkey has changed in recent decades.

Members of the military, once the guardians of the country’s secular traditions who successfully pulled off three coups last century, were being rounded up and tossed in jail, and other perceived enemies were being purged from the state bureaucracy.

The Islamists, meanwhile, were dancing in the streets.

That is where, Mr. Erdogan said on Sunday, they would remain.

“This week is important,” he told a crowd gathered at Istanbul’s Fatih Mosque for a funeral for a person killed in the violence over the weekend. “We will not leave the public squares. This is not a 12-hour affair.”

The coup attempt seems to have been decisively quashed, with nearly 6,000 military personnel in custody. Funerals for many of the at least 265 people who died in clashes were taking place across Turkey on Sunday.

Now the country is left to consider what the lasting consequences of the uprising will be. While Mr. Erdogan has fended off a coup, the most urgent question is this: Has he emerged even more powerful, or is he now a weakened leader who must accommodate his opponents?

That much of the country, including those who have bitterly opposed his government, stood against a military coup as a violation of democracy has raised hopes that Mr. Erdogan will seize the moment to reach across Turkey’s many political divides and unite the country.

Yet as the weekend progressed, it was becoming clearer that for Mr. Erdogan and his religiously conservative followers, the moment was a triumph of political Islam more than anything else.

While secular and liberal Turks generally opposed the coup, it was Mr. Erdogan’s supporters who flooded the streets and gathered at Istanbul’s airport Saturday morning to push out the occupying army. They mostly yelled religious slogans and chants in support of Mr. Erdogan, not of democracy itself.

Interactive Feature | The Arc of a Coup Attempt in Turkey Here is a visual timeline of the country’s violent and chaotic insurrection.

After Mr. Erdogan’s speech on Saturday, thousands of his supporters marched down Istiklal Street in Istanbul to Taksim Square, mostly waving Turkish flags and shouting in support of their president.

It felt like a rollicking street carnival. Women in head scarves filled the square, a truck played a song about Mr. Erdogan, and passing motorists honked and waved flags.

That they were able to gather in public at all was significant, ample evidence that Turkey is, these days, for Mr. Erdogan and his supporters.

When other groups, like gay and lesbian organizations or labor unions, try to gather in public spaces in central Istanbul, the streets are sealed off. Armored vehicles with water cannons suddenly materialize, as do police officers with tear gas canisters.

“It was nice here today,” said Ali Tuysuz, 19, who was selling watermelon slices on Saturday in Taksim. “People are happy and buying watermelon. My tray was emptied three times. President Erdogan will protect the country.”

Map | Turkey

The mosques’ role in mobilizing citizens to gather in the streets as the coup was unfolding was decisive, but it nonetheless unsettled many secular Turks. They called it a historic sidestep of Turkey’s secular principles, in which religion is meant to be separate from politics.

On Sunday, Turkey’s nearly 85,000 mosques, in unison, blared from their loudspeakers a prayer traditionally recited for martyrs who have died in war and called for people to continue to rally against the plotters of the coup.

“Most of the people who went out in the streets to oppose the coup d’état did not use democratic language,” said Ozgur Unluhisarcikli, the director of the Ankara office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, a research organization.

“There are people for whom Islam plays a big role in their lives in Turkey,” he added. “And there are people for whom Islam plays no role.”

As Turks waited to see in which direction their mercurial and powerful leader would steer the country in the wake of the coup attempt, Mr. Erdogan struck some conciliatory notes on Sunday. Yet he has also raised the possibility that Turkey would reinstate the death penalty, which it had abolished as a part of its pursuit to join the European Union.

“If they have guns and tanks, we have faith,” said Mr. Erdogan, who also attended a funeral of a friend who was killed, and was seen crying. “We are not after revenge. So let us think before taking each step. We will act with reason and experience.”

Nigar Goksel, a senior Turkey analyst for the International Crisis Group, said there were two possible directions. “Either Erdogan utilizes this incident to redesign institutions in Ankara to his own benefit,” she said, “or he takes the opportunity with the solidarity that was extended to him by the opposition and different segments of society to reciprocate by investing more genuinely in rule of law and legitimate forms of dissent.”

Mr. Erdogan’s history suggests the latter possibility is unlikely. Each time he has faced a challenge to his power, from street protests three years ago to a corruption investigation that went after his inner circle, he has sidelined his enemies and become more autocratic.

Already, even as the government has arrested thousands of soldiers and officers who allegedly took part in the failed coup, there were signs that it was using the moment to widen a crackdown on perceived enemies. Alongside the military, the government also dismissed thousands of judges, who seemingly had no role to play in a military revolt.

“Now the government has a free hand to design the bureaucracy as they like, and they will,” Mr. Unluhisarcikli said. “All in all, Turkey will become a country where power is more consolidated and dissent will be more difficult.”

Interactive Feature | Today’s Headlines: European Morning Get news and analysis from Europe and around the world delivered to your inbox every day in the European morning.

As the purge of the military continued on Sunday, one of those arrested was Gen. Bekir Ercan Van, the chief of Incirlik Air Base, from which the United States military flies missions over Iraq and Syria against the Islamic State. Over the weekend, General Van approached American officials seeking asylum but was refused, according to a person with knowledge of the matter who spoke anonymously because of the sensitive nature of the subject.

The Greek prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, told Mr. Erdogan that the government would swiftly examine asylum claims by eight Turkish officers who fled to northern Greece in a helicopter and were detained on charges of illegal entry. Turkey has demanded their extradition.

As the drama of the coup attempt played out Friday and into Saturday morning, it looked for a moment as if Mr. Erdogan was on the verge of being toppled from power. The president spoke to the nation via the FaceTime app on his iPhone after he narrowly escaped being captured by mutinous soldiers, who arrived in a helicopter at a seaside hotel where he was vacationing — just after he had departed.

Then, around 3:30 a.m., he landed in Istanbul, after a dangerous flight undertaken while the plotters still had fighter jets in the air — the surest sign that the revolt was failing.

But more than his dramatic arrival at the Istanbul airport, his confident speech on Saturday on top of the bus seemed to emphatically declare that he was back in charge.

Celebrations by his supporters continued on Sunday, with jubilant crowds marching through the streets of Istanbul.

“Look around you,” one of the supporters, Eytan Karatas, 37, a mechanic, said. “Look at these people. We are the real soldiers of this country, and we have a chief.”

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BATON ROUGE, La. — Three law enforcement officers were fatally shot and at least three others wounded on Sunday in Baton Rouge, La., the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Office said, less than two weeks after a black man was killed by the police here, sparking nightly protests.

A suspect had been killed, most likely by police gunfire, and two others, described as wearing all black, were being sought, said a police spokesman, Cpl. L’Jean McKneely.

“We do believe there is more than one suspect,” he said.

Speaking to reporters in Baton Rouge, Corporal McKneely said officers responding to the shooting were checking the area, a major thoroughfare dotted with gas stations and large discount stores, for possible explosives. “We’re going to check the scene thoroughly to protect ourselves,” he said.

Sunday’s shooting is the latest episode in a month of violence and extraordinary racial tension in the country, and took place after Baton Rouge officers on July 5 fatally shot Alton B. Sterling, a black man who was selling CDs outside a convenience store. The night after Mr. Sterling was killed, a black man was killed by the police during a traffic stop in a St. Paul suburb, and then the next night, five police officers were killed by a gunman in Dallas who said he wanted to kill police officers, particularly white officers.

Details remained sketchy on Sunday afternoon, and it was unclear whether the attack on the police had been planned or happened during another crime. There were varying reports about the number of officers wounded, with one reporting seven.

The shooting was met here with disbelief. “It’s just crazy, we should be worried about what we’re gonna leave our kids 20-30 years from now,” said Bryce Butler, 27, a cook at the Rum House restaurant, which is near the shooting scene. “I think no one should be victimized, cops or anyone.”

“It shouldn’t have happened,” said Dan Williams, 46, an electrician. “Both incidents were sad,” he said referring to Mr. Sterling’s death and Sunday’s shooting. He anticipates more violence.

Map | Site of Shooting

Carol D. Powell Lexing, a lawyer for the Sterling family, said in an interview that the family did not condone the shooting of officers and that protesting police misconduct was “not all out war on the entire police department.”

“No one condones violence on anyone and we certainly don’t condone the shootings that have gone forth in Dallas and now in Baton Rouge,” she said. “It saddens our heart that we are even back to having this conversation again, having a repeat, having some type of copycat out there. We ask that there be no more copycats.”

The police in Baton Rouge had in recent days announced that they were investigating a plot by four people to shoot at police officers, and they cited the threat to explain the heavy police presence at protests.

Police said a 17-year-old was arrested after running from a burglary of the Cash American Pawn Shop in Baton Rouge. He and three others, including a 12-year-old arrested on Friday, were believed to have broken into the pawnshop through the roof. It was unclear whether the burglary was in any way connected to Sunday’s shooting.

The chief, Carl Dabadie Jr., told reporters at the time that the 17-year-old had told the police “that the reason the burglary was being done was to harm police officers.”

The explanation, however, was met with skepticism on social media sites, where many people believed the report was concocted by the police to justify their militarized response to the protest.

“That was bull, it was a scare tactic to calm things down,” Arthur Reed, of Stop the Killing, the group that first released the video of Mr. Sterling’s shooting, said Sunday. “And it worked. I ain’t going out there if people are going to be out there trying to kill police.”

The intense protests after Mr. Sterling’s shooting were beginning to lose steam. Sima Atri, a social justice lawyer who represented some of the protesters who were arrested last weekend, said earlier in the week that many protesters were too afraid to hit the streets after the authorities’ heavy-handed approach last weekend, which included nearly 200 arrests. (Nearly 100 charges were dropped Friday.)

A protest Saturday afternoon had less than a dozen people (all of them white), huddled on the side of the road under a tent, to escape the blazing sun, flashing signs at passing cars. Once the sun went down, the crowd grew to about 125 people, most of them white, Mr. Reed said. Corporal McKneely said it was unclear if the shooting on Sunday was connected to the protests. “We are not sure of anything right now,” he said.

The episode on Sunday began when the police received reports of an individual walking with an assault rifle near the Hammond Aire Plaza shopping center on Airline Highway. Then around 8:30 a.m., gunfire erupted.

Mark Clements, who lives near the shopping center, said he was in his backyard when he heard shots ring out. “I heard probably 10 to 12 gunshots go off,” he said in a telephone interview. “We heard a bunch of sirens and choppers and everything since then.”

On the Police Department’s dispatch radio, a voice could be heard shouting: “Shots fired! Officer down! Shots fired. Officer down! Got a city officer down.”

Officers from both the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office and the Baton Rouge Police Department were struck by bullets, the authorities said.

Trooper Cedrick Ross with the Louisiana State Police said in a brief phone interview that law enforcement officials were still working on gathering information on the identification and description of the suspect. He said that the only information that was “somewhat confirmed” was that the suspect was a black male who had been wearing a ski mask.

Wounded officers were taken to Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, which was swarmed with police officers Sunday afternoon.

Kelly Zimmerman, a hospital spokeswoman, said five law enforcement officers had been admitted there, three of whom had died from their wounds. One person was listed in critical condition, and another was listed in fair condition, she said. Rebekah Maricelli, a spokeswoman with Baton Rouge General Medical Hospital, said in an interview that a sixth person, whom she described as a police officer, had been admitted to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Kip Holden, the mayor-president of East Baton Rouge Parish.

Gerald Herbert / Associated Press

In a statement, Gov. John Bel Edwards of Louisiana scheduled a 3 p.m. news conference to discuss the shooting.

“This is an unspeakable and unjustified attack on all of us at a time when we need unity and healing,” the governor said in a statement, “Rest assured, every resource available to the State of Louisiana will be used to ensure the perpetrators are swiftly brought to justice.”

Louisiana has lately taken a harder line to defend its police officers, who this year will become a protected class under the state’s hate crimes law.

“I’ve read various accounts of people who I would say were employing a deliberate campaign to terrorize our officers,” State Representative Lance Harris, a Republican and the author of the proposal, said this year. “I just wanted to give an extra level of protection to the people who protect us.”

Mr. Harris’s proposal, which the Legislature overwhelmingly approved and Governor Edwards signed in May, will make it a hate crime to select a victim “because of actual or perceived employment as a law enforcement officer, firefighter or emergency medical services personnel.”

The shooting in Baton Rouge took place as protesters and Republicans were arriving in Cleveland for the party’s national convention. Steve Thacker, 57, of Westlake, Ohio, stood in Cleveland’s Public Square on Sunday holding a semiautomatic AR-15-style assault rifle as news broke that several officers had been killed in Baton Rouge.

After the shooting in Dallas, Stephen Loomis, the president of the Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association, urged people not to take their guns anywhere near Cleveland’s downtown during the convention because officers were already in a “heightened state.”

When asked about Mr. Loomis’s comments and the Baton Rouge shooting, Mr. Thacker said despite the shooting, he wanted to make a statement and show that people can continue to openly carry their weapons.

“I pose no threat to anyone. I’m an American citizen. I’ve never been in trouble for anything,” Mr. Thacker, an information technology engineer, said. “This is my time to come out and put my two cents worth in, albeit that it is a very strong statement.”

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ISTANBUL — The Latest on Turkey’s failed military coup. (all times local):

9:45 p.m.

Thousands of Turks are rallying again in the capital and other cities to show their support for President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his party whose leadership was challenged in a failed coup.

As night set in Sunday, large crowds carrying Turkish flags streamed into Ankara’s Kizilay Square and Taksim Square in Istanbul after authorities called on the public to stay vigilant and continue to protect Turkish democracy.

Similar demonstrations were held outside the president’s residence in Istanbul, the mainly Kurdish city of Diyarbakir and the coastal cities of Izmir and Antalya, according to local media reports and footage.

At least 265 people were killed in clashes when parts of the Turkish military attempted to seize power.

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8:10 p.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has shed tears at a funeral two days after a failed military coup.

Erdogan’s campaign manager, Erol Olcak and the man’s 16-year-old son Abdullah Tayyip Olcak, were killed when renegade soldiers opened fire on protesters at the Bosporus bridge in Istanbul on Friday night. Yeni Safak journalist Mustafa Cambaz was killed by gunfire in Istanbul.

At their funeral, Erdogan was overpowered by emotions and cried. He used a handkerchief to wipe away the tears and turned around as he continued to weep.

Erdogan vowed to take the country forward in “unity and solidarity.”

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7:50 p.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gave signals that Turkey might reinstate capital punishment in the wake of Friday’s failed coup attempt.

Erdogan spoke to his supporters in front of his Istanbul residence Sunday evening. His speech was punctuated by frequent calls of “we want the death penalty” from the large crowd, to which Erdogan responded: “We hear your request. In a democracy, whatever the people want they will get.”

Adding that they will be in contact with Turkey’s opposition parties to reach a position of capital punishment, “We will not delay this decision for long. Because those who attempt a coup in this country must pay.”

Turkey hasn’t executed anyone since 1984 and capital punishment was legally abolished in 2004 as part of its bid to join the European Union.

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7:35 p.m.

Turkish official says law enforcement officials fired warning shots at Istanbul’s Sabiha Gocen Airport after backers of the failed coup had resisted arrest.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government protocol, initially reported there were clashes in the area.

He later retracted that statement saying there was “no exchange” of fire and security forces had only fired “warning shots.”

Meanwhile, Anadolu Agency reported that seven people, including a colonel were detained at an air base in the central Anatolian city of Konya.

The same official said the situation in Konya was “under control” after coup backers there also resisted arrest.

“This is why we have been asking the people to stand guard and remain aware,” he said.

–By Dominique Soguel in Istanbul.

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7 p.m.

Turkey’s state-run news agency says police officers have entered an air base in central Turkey to arrest military personnel.

Anadolu Agency says police had entered the air force base in Konya to round up high-ranking officers as part of the investigation into Friday’s failed coup attempt.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said Sunday that the coup plotters have been defeated, the coup has failed and life has returned to normal.

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6:45 p.m.

The top U.S. military officer says U.S. officials were surprised by the attempted overthrow of the Turkish government.

Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, says Sunday in an interview with The Associated Press that he was pleased by the response of top Turkish military leaders to the coup attempt led by a minority of officers.

Dunford was in Afghanistan when the coup attempt was made.

Dunford says he hasn’t yet spoken to his Turkish counterpart, Gen. Hulusi Akar, who had been detained by the coup leaders and then rescued. He said he hopes to speak to him in coming days.

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5:20 p.m.

Thousands have attended the funeral of six people in Istanbul who were killed during a botched coup attempt in Turkey.

At least 265 people were killed in clashes when parts of the Turkish military attempted to seize power.

Among those buried in Istanbul was Ilhan Varank, the brother of Mustafa Varank, an aide to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Relatives of those killed wept and clutched each other for comfort amid chants of “God is great.”

Mourners also called for the death penalty for a U.S.-based cleric the authorities blame for the coup.

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5:05 p.m.

Turkey’s state-run news agency says authorities have issued a warrant for the arrest of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s top military aide.

The Anadolu Agency says Sunday the warrant was issued against Col. Ali Yazici following Friday’s failed coup attempt. It wasn’t immediately clear what role, if any, Yazici played in the attempted coup that started late Friday.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim says the coup plotters have been defeated, the coup has failed and life has returned to normal.

___

5 p.m.

The Pentagon says Turkey has reopened its airspace to military aircraft, allowing the U.S.-led coalition to resume air operations against the Islamic State group.

Turkey had closed its airspace following an attempted coup, which was crushed.

Pentagon Press Secretary Peter Cook says “U.S. facilities at Incirlik are still operating on internal power sources, but we hope to restore commercial power soon. Base operations have not been affected.”

Turkey, a NATO member, is a key partner in U.S.-led efforts to defeat the Islamic State group, and has allowed American jets to use its Incirlik air base to fly missions against the extremists in nearby Syria and Iraq.

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4:40 p.m.

Turkey’s deputy prime minister says that crushing the coup attempt was a lesson to anti-democratic forces around the world.

In an interview with CNN-Turk Sunday, Numan Kurtulmus wouldn’t comment on who authorities suspect is the chief instigator of the attempt, saying the investigation was underway.

He said: “the hierarchy of this coup, of this junta will be brought to light.”

Turkish officials have blamed the coup on a U.S.-based Muslim cleric, Fethullah Gulen, who strongly denies the accusation.

Asked whether the government would start a witch hunt, Kurtulmus said authorities would purge the cleric’s supporters within the rules of law.

He also said he believed that Greece, which has suffered as much as Turkey from military coups, would stand against the coup plotters who fled to the Greece.

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3:50 p.m.

A Syrian government newspaper says the failed coup in Turkey was fabricated and aimed at tarnishing the reputation of the military.

The daily Al-Thawra said Sunday that the attempted coup was a plot by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to “avenge the military and strip it of its remaining popular support.”

It said police loyal to Erdogan “deliberately humiliated” the army in front of the people.

Erdogan is a strong backer of the insurgents trying to remove President Bashar Assad from power in neighboring Syria. The Syrian government views the rebels as terrorists.

___

3:45 p.m.

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim says the coup plotters have been defeated, the coup has failed and life has returned to normal.

He made the victory declaration Sunday after visiting state TRT television station headquarters in Ankara.

The broadcaster was temporarily seized and used by soldiers to announce a coup on Friday.

The prime minister asked that people remain in the streets in the evenings to continue to protect and celebrate democracy.

“Another calamity has been thwarted,” Yildirim said. “However, our duty is not over. We shall rapidly conduct the cleansing operation so that they cannot again show the audacity of coming against the will of the people.”

___

3:40 p.m.

A lawyer says the eight Turkish military officers charged in Greece with illegal entry claim they initially knew nothing about Friday’s coup attempt.

Ilia Marinaki says the officers were ordered to carry injured people in their helicopter. She says that soon after finding out the coup, they were fired at by police, were scared and crossed the border, emitting a distress signal. They were allowed to land at Alexandroupolis, the closest airport inside Greece.

The officers are being held in the town of Ferres, near Alexandroupolis, and are in court Monday.

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3:35 p.m.

Eight Turkish officers who landed in Greece in a helicopter Saturday have been charged with illegal entry.

The officers were examined by a magistrate in the northeastern city of Alexandroupolis, near the border with Turkey.

The pilot was charged with an illegal flight into the country, and the other seven were charged as accessories.

The eight officers will appear in court Monday and are likely to ask for a one- or two-day postponement to answer the charges, lawyer Ilia Marinaki said.

The eight have applied for political asylum in Greece. The Greek government has said that it will examine their demand, as prescribed by international law, while taking into account that they are wanted in Turkey and accused of trying to subvert the constitution.

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3:25 p.m.

A Turkish government official says the commander of an air base used by U.S.-led coalition jets that conduct bombing runs against the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria has been detained.

The official said Sunday that Gen. Bekir Ercan Van, 10 other soldiers and one police officer from the Incirlik base are detained for their role in the botched Friday coup attempt.

The Turkish private DHA news agency showed footage of Van handcuffed and pushed into a van outside a courthouse.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity in line with regulations.

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3 p.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vowed to purge all state institutions of supporters of an Islamist cleric his government blames for Friday’s failed coup attempt.

Speaking at a funeral in Istanbul on Sunday, Erdogan vowed to “clean all state institutions of the virus” of Fethullah Gulen supporters.

He said Turkey, through the justice ministry and foreign ministry, would request the extradition of the cleric, who is based in the United States, and his backers.

Crowds chanted “Fethullah will come and pay,” ”Allah is Great” and “We want the death penalty.”

Erdogan said that in democracies, “you cannot push the wish of the people to one side” but also said “we are not after revenge.”

The cleric, whose movement is labelled a terrorist group by Turkey, has denied any involvement in the coup effort.

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2:55 p.m.

Turkish Airlines says it has canceled 196 domestic and international flights in and out of Istanbul due to disruptions in air traffic brought on by Friday night’s attempted coup.

The cancellations will affect flights on Sunday and Monday.

Regular operations had resumed on Saturday, but a backlog of flights congested traffic at Istanbul’s main Ataturk International Airport.

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration had suspended all U.S. airline carriers from flying to or from Istanbul and Ankara Airports. All airline carriers, regardless of country, are also prohibited from flying into the U.S. from Turkey either directly or via a third country.

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2:05 p.m.

Turkey’s president has spoken with Russian President Vladimir Putin following the failed military coup attempt.

A statement from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s office said Putin said Moscow stood by “Turkey’s elected government” and expressed his good wishes to the Turkish people.

It said the two leaders — who recently patched up relations following Turkey’s downing of a Russian warplane — also agreed to meet face-to-face next month.

___

1:15 p.m.

Turkey’s justice minister says some 6,000 people have been detained in a government crackdown on alleged coup plotters and government opponents.

Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag says in a television interview that “the cleansing (operation) is continuing. Some 6,000 detentions have taken place. The number could surpass 6,000.”

Bozdag also said he was confident that the United States would return Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen to Turkey. The Turkish president has blamed Gulen and his followers for the failed military coup on Friday night, but Gulen has denied any involvement in or knowledge about the attempted coup. The U.S. says it will look at any evidence Turkey has to offer against Gulen, and judge accordingly.

Bozdag says “the United States would weaken itself by protecting him, it would harm its reputation. I don’t think that at this hour, the United States would protect someone who carried out this act against Turkey.”

___

12:35 p.m.

Prayers are being read simultaneously from Turkey’s 85,000 mosques at noon to rally the country to defend its democracy and honor those who died in an attempted military coup.

Sela prayers are traditionally recited from mosques during funerals, though they are also performed to rally people. During Friday night’s attempted military coup, sela prayers were repeatedly recited from mosques across the country throughout the night to rally the people against the coup plotters.

Religious Affairs Directorate President Mehmet Görmez told private channel Ulke TV that “as a nation who wasn’t disturbed by the barrel of tanks pointed at the people or the sounds of F-16s flying overhead, I do not see anyone in this land who would be disturbed by the sound of sela. This tradition will continue.”

___

12:10 p.m.

The Turkish government has accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the botched coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, issuing dozens of arrest warrants for judges and prosecutors and detaining military officers.

Already, three of the country’s top generals have been detained, alongside hundreds of soldiers. The government has also dismissed nearly 3,000 judges and prosecutors from their posts, while investigators were preparing court cases to send the conspirators to trial on charges of attempting to overthrow the government.

The botched coup, which saw warplanes fly over key government installations and tanks roll up in major cities briefly, ended hours later when loyal government forces including military and police— regained control of the military and civilians took to the streets in support of Erdogan.

At least 265 people were killed and over 1,400 were wounded. Government officials say at least 104 conspirators were killed.

___

12 noon

Chanting, dancing and waving flags, tens of thousands of Turks marched through the streets into the wee to defend democracy and support the country’s long-time leader after a failed military coup shocked the nation.

It was an emotional display by Turks, who rallied in headscarves and long dresses, T-shirts and work boots, some walking hand-in-hand late Saturday and early Sunday with their children. Rather than toppling Turkey’s strongman president, the attempted coup that left some 265 dead and 1,440 wounded appears to have bolstered Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s popularity and grip on power.

Gozde Kurt, a 16-year-old student at the rally in Istanbul, says Sunday that “just a small group from Turkish armed forces stood up against our government … but we, the Turkish nation, stand together and repulse it back.”

The Yeni Safak newspaper used the headline “Traitors of the country,” while the Hurriyet newspaper declared “Democracy’s victory.”

___

11:20 a.m.

Turkish security forces have rounded up 52 more military officers for alleged coup links and issued detention orders for 53 more judges and prosecutors, continuing the purge of judges seen as government opponents.

Officials say about 3,000 soldiers, including officers, are already in detention. Almost a similar number of judges and prosecutors have been dismissed.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said the perpetrators of Friday’s failed coup “will receive every punishment they deserve,” and the government said it would take steps toward extraditing a U.S.-based cleric it accused of fomenting the uprising.

Still, the government crackdowns raised concerns over the future of democracy in Turkey, which has long prided itself on its democratic and secular traditions despite being in a region swept by conflict and extremism.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s survival has turned him into a “sort of a mythical figure” and could further erode democracy in Turkey, said Soner Cagaptay, director of the Turkish research program at The Washington Institute.

“It will allow him to crack down on liberty and freedom of association, assembly, expression and media in ways that we haven’t seen before,” he said.

___

10 a.m.

The coup attempt, which started with tanks rolling Friday night into the streets of Ankara and Istanbul as the president was on a seaside vacation, has claimed at least 265 lives, according to officials.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said 161 people were killed and 1,440 wounded in the process of putting down the coup attempt, while Gen. Umit Dundar said at least 104 “coup plotters” had died.

Explosions and gunfire erupted throughout the night. It quickly became clear, however, that the military was not united in the effort to overthrow the government. In a dramatic iPhone interview broadcast on TV early Saturday, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan urged his supporters into the streets to confront the troops and tanks, and forces loyal to the government began reasserting control.

Before the chaos, Turkey — a NATO member and key Western ally in the fight against the Islamic State group — had been wracked by political turmoil that critics blamed on Erdogan’s increasingly authoritarian rule. He has shaken up the government, cracked down on dissidents, restricted the news media and renewed fighting with Kurdish rebels.

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ISTANBUL — Turkey’s government, rallying behind its defiant leader, rounded up thousands of military personnel on Saturday who were said to have taken part in an attempted coup, moving swiftly to re-establish control after a night of chaos and intrigue that left hundreds dead.

By midday, there were few signs that those who had taken part in the coup attempt were still able to challenge the government, and many officials declared the uprising a failure.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, speaking to hundreds of flag-waving supporters outside his home in Istanbul on Saturday evening, declared that “the strong aren’t always right, but the right are always strong.” He called on the United States to arrest an exile living in Pennsylvania who Mr. Erdogan claimed was behind the coup attempt.

As the insurrection unfolded Friday night, beginning with the seizing of two bridges in Istanbul by military forces, Mr. Erdogan was not heard from for hours. He finally addressed the nation from an undisclosed location, speaking on his cellphone’s FaceTime app — a dramatic scene that seemed to suggest a man on the verge of losing power. But in the early hours of Saturday, he landed in Istanbul, and steadily found his voice again, lashing out at his opponents, and one in particular.

Mr. Erdogan placed blame for the intrigue on the followers of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric living in exile in Pennsylvania, who was the president’s ally until a bitter falling out three years ago. Mr. Gulen’s followers were known to have a strong presence in Turkey’s police and judiciary, but less so in the military.

On Saturday morning, Mr. Erdogan said, referring to Mr. Gulen, “I have a message for Pennsylvania: You have engaged in enough treason against this nation. If you dare, come back to your country.”

On Saturday evening, Mr. Erdogan, standing atop a bus outside his home, pressed this theme in a thundering message to his supporters, calling on the United States to arrest Mr. Gulen and send him back to Turkey.

Interactive Feature | Tumult in Turkey: More Coverage

Even before Mr. Erdogan’s speech, the gist of which American officials have heard before, Secretary of State John Kerry said Saturday that he would listen to any inquiries Turkey might have about the cleric.

“We fully anticipate that there will be questions raised about Mr. Gulen,” he said.

In a statement released on the website of his group, Alliance for Shared Values, and in an interview with The New York Times on Saturday, Mr. Gulen condemned the coup, denied any link to it and expressed support for the democratic process, saying that “through military intervention, democracy cannot be achieved.”

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, calling the insurrection “a stain in the history of democracy,” put the death toll in the clashes at 265, including civilians, pro-government forces and troops involved in the coup attempt, and said 1,440 people had been wounded. He added that 2,839 military personnel had been detained.

Later in the day, Defense Minister Fikri Isik said that the state authorities were in full control of all areas in Turkey but that vigilance was required. “We have prevented the coup,” Mr. Isik said, “but it is too soon to say that the danger is over.”

Noting the intensity of the violence that had erupted, Mr. Erdogan said that Turkish fighter jets had bombed tanks on the streets of Ankara, and that a military helicopter being used by the coup plotters had been shot down.

There was also a battle early Saturday at Turkey’s intelligence headquarters in Ankara, which government forces later secured, and a Turkish official said the intelligence chief, Hakan Fidan, had been taken to a secure location.

In a news briefing on Saturday, Turkey’s top military officer, Gen. Umit Dundar, the acting head of the general staff, said that “the coup attempt was rejected by the chain of command immediately.”

“The people have taken to the streets and voiced their support for democracy,” he said, adding that “the nation will never forget this betrayal.” General Dundar emphasized that only a small minority within the military, including members of the air force, a military-style police force and armored units, had revolted.

“The army is ours,” Mr. Erdogan said Saturday night. “I am the chief commander.”

Supporters of the government demonstrated in Istanbul and other cities on Saturday night, chanting their disdain for the coup attempt as drivers honked their horns. “We will not fall, everything for our country,” some people shouted as they waved large Turkish flags in the air.

Even as it appeared that the elected government had re-established control, many questions remained, including who was behind the plot and what long-term damage had been done to the political system of Turkey, a NATO ally and important partner to the United States in the fight against the Islamic State.

Much of the violence overnight related to the coup attempt was in Ankara, where different branches of the security forces fought one another over control of government buildings, including the Parliament building, where several explosions were reported.

Early Saturday, soldiers surrendered on a bridge that traverses the Bosporus, one of two bridges that the military shut down as the coup attempt began Friday evening. Footage showed abandoned military clothing and helmets along the bridge. The government also moved on a military school in Istanbul, arresting dozens.

Disciplinary actions extended to the judicial system on Saturday as an oversight body, the High Council of Judges and Prosecutors, announced that 2,745 judges had been dismissed, the Anadolu agency reported.

Turkey has a long history of military involvement in politics — there have been three coups since 1960, and the military forced another government to step down — and as the country became deeply polarized in recent years between supporters of Mr. Erdogan’s Islamist government and those loyal to Turkey’s secular traditions, many wondered if the military would intervene. Some, quietly, had even hoped it would.

But once the coup was attempted, people in the country, even those bitterly opposed to Mr. Erdogan, seemed to have no desire for a return to military rule. Turks across the political spectrum, including the main opposition parties that represent secular Turks, nationalists and Kurds, opposed the coup. So did many top generals, highlighting that the attempt apparently did not have deep support even in the military.

Speaking from Luxembourg, Mr. Kerry reiterated the United States’ support for the Erdogan government. “We stand by the government of Turkey,” he said.

Mr. Kerry said it was not surprising that the United States and Turkey’s other NATO allies had not been aware of the coup before it occurred.

“If you’re planning a coup, you don’t exactly advertise it to your partners in NATO,” Mr. Kerry said. “It surprised everybody, including the people in Turkey. I must say it does not appear to be a very brilliantly planned or executed event.”

Chancellor Angela Merkel and Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier of Germany expressed concern about the developments in Turkey and called for a return to the rule of law, under the democratically elected government. Ms. Merkel said political change should take place only through democratic procedures.

“Tanks on the streets and attacks from the air against their own people are against the law,” she said.

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By Associated Press,

CLEVELAND — The Latest on the 2016 race for president (all times local):

8:05 p.m.

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign has named six staffers to manage the efforts of newly named vice presidential candidate Mike Pence.

The governor of Indiana was formally presented as Trump’s running mate Saturday, a day after Trump announced the choice on Twitter.

The Pence campaign staff, with Nick Ayers as senior adviser, will manage day-to-day operations for Pence and work with the remainder of the Trump campaign team.

Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort welcomed the new members of the campaign staff and praised Pence as “a man of impeccable character.”

Others on the campaign team are manager of vice presidential operations Marty Obst; policy director Josh Pitcock; press secretary Marc Lotter; adviser KellyAnne Conway; and communications adviser Marc Short. The campaign says it will continue to expand its team for the general election in coming days.

___

7:30 p.m.

Mike Pence got choked-up when he arrived home to a cheering crowd celebrating his addition to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

The Indiana governor turned presidential running mate returned in a private jet Saturday evening and told those assembled at a hangar that the last few days had been “pretty overwhelming.”

Pence thanked individual members of his family during a short address and asked for prayers. The Republican vice presidential candidate told the crowd that Trump is a good man who will be a “great president.”

Divisive social issues have been a hallmark of Pence’s tenure as governor. He told the crowd that he would take “Hoosier ideals to Washington” if elected.

___

6:10 p.m.

Now officially part of Donald Trump’s presidential ticket, Mike Pence arrived back home in the style of his new boss.

The theme music from the movie “Air Force One” blared over loudspeakers as a plane carrying Pence pulled up to a hangar at a suburban Indianapolis airport on Saturday evening, mirroring Trump’s trademark campaign rally entrance.

But the similarities stopped there, as Pence spoke to the crowd from a podium with no campaign sign attached and for just a few minutes.

The newly minted vice presidential candidate said he and his wife Karen will “cherish the Hoosier homecoming” for the “rest of our lives,” and he asked attendees of the homecoming rally to pray for his family in the coming months.

He then asked the crowd to vote for Trump for the sake of the nation’s servicemen and women, for hardworking Americans and a Supreme Court that will “uphold our Constitution.”

Trump formally introduced Pence as his running mate on Saturday in New York. Pence says he and his family planned to cap their big day with a Saturday evening “pizza night” at the Indiana governor’s residence.

___

5:55 p.m.

Several hundred people are gathered in a suburban Indianapolis airplane hangar, waiting for Gov. Mike Pence to arrive back home in Indiana after his formal debut as Donald Trump’s running mate.

A handful of state lawmakers and elected officials are among the crowd at the “Welcome Home” rally, including Indiana congresswoman Susan Brooks and the state’s outgoing U.S. senator, Dan Coats.

The less-than-half-full hangar is devoid of any campaign signs or other hints that Pence is now a part of the Republican presidential ticket, aside from the music. Trump campaign rally standards by the Rolling Stones and Elton John are playing on a loop as the crowd waits for Pence, who is running about an hour late.

___

1:20 p.m.

A Montana lawmaker has resigned as a delegate to the Republican National Convention over the GOP’s position on the transfer of federal lands to states.

Republican U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke told The (Billings) Gazette that he still plans to give a speech Monday to the convention about national security. But he says he’s withdrawing as a delegate because the GOP platform is “more divisive than uniting.”

The party’s platform committee this past week endorsed draft language that calls on Congress to pass legislation that would shift some federally controlled public lands to the states.

This has been a major issue in Montana’s House race. Zinke says he supports better management but not transfer to the states.

A reserve Montana delegate will have to be appointed to replace him.

___

12:45 p.m.

Hillary Clinton will promise to introduce an amendment overturning Citizens United, the Supreme Court ruling that opened the door to a flood of corporate and union spending in politics.

Her campaign says the Democratic presidential candidate will make her announcement in a video shown on Saturday to liberal activists meeting at the annual Netroots Nation conference in St. Louis.

The 2010 decision has become a rallying cry for those seeking to limit the influence of money in politics. The ruling led to the rise of Super PACs and boosted the effect of nonprofit spending. Both groups can now accept unlimited donations.

Overturning the decision was a key plank in the campaign of primary rival Bernie Sanders, who refused corporate donations.

Unlike Sanders, Clinton supports Super PACs working on her behalf, saying Democrats cannot unilaterally disarm. But she’s also stressed the need to get “secret, unaccountable money” out of the political system.

___

12:10 p.m.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has delivered a ringing endorsement of Donald Trump as he joins him as the vice presidential candidate on the Republican ticket.

Pence quickly proved comfortable using Trump’s slogan, declaring “we need to make America great again and that day begins when Donald Trump becomes the 45th President of the United States.”

Pence touted Trump’s pledges to repeal Obamacare, revive the coal industry and toughen the nation’s immigration policy. Pence did so while suggesting Hillary Clinton’s policy proposals would weaken the nation’s economy and its security.

Trump officially introduced Pence as his running mate at a low-key rally on Saturday in New York. When he brought Pence to the stage, the celebrity businessman shook his hand and patted his forearm before quickly exiting. He came back for a photo with their families at the end of the governor’s remarks.

Pence is scheduled to appear at a rally in Indiana later Saturday. Trump is not scheduled to join him.

___

11:50 a.m.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has officially accepted Donald Trump’s offer to join him on the Republican presidential ticket.

Pence says at an announcement event on Saturday in New York that Trump “is a great man and he will make a great president of the United States of America.”

He says he was “honored” to accept the offer to join the ticket, because the country needs “strong Republican leadership” and because presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton can never be president.

___

11:40 a.m.

Donald Trump says his selection of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate is one that will help him restore manufacturing jobs nationwide and protect religious freedom.

The presumptive Republican nominee spoke for nearly a half-hour Saturday as he introduced his pick for vice president, calling Pence onto the stage at the end.

Trump touted Indiana’s falling unemployment rate and said that Pence would help his campaign and his potential administration protect the freedom of speech of religious institutions.

He also touted Pence’s family and said the governor “looks good.” He even noted that while Pence endorsed GOP rival Ted Cruz in Indiana’s primary, the governor also praised Trump as he did so.

But while Trump says Pence’s selection was partially driven by a desire to promote “party unity,” Trump took a moment to attack the so-called “Never Trump” delegates attending next week’s Republican National Convention.

He brags that they’ve been “crushed.”

___

11:30 a.m.

Donald Trump says the man who will join him on the Republican presidential ticket is a “man of character, honor and honesty.”

Trump calls Indiana Gov. Mike Pence “a solid, solid person” and is contrasting his character to what he deemed “the corruption of Hillary Clinton,” his likely Democratic opponent in the fall election.

Trump declares at an announcement event Saturday morning in New York, “What a difference between crooked Hillary Clinton and Mike Pence.”

The two men are scheduled to formally become their party’s nominees at next week’s Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Trump says he and Pence are the “the law and order candidates,” adding that his potential administration would be far tougher on both foreign and domestic terrorism than would Clinton.

___

11:20 a.m.

Donald Trump is introducing Mike Pence as his running mate, calling Indiana’s governor “his first choice” to join him on the Republican presidential ticket.

Trump spoke with Pence on Saturday morning in a ballroom of a New York City hotel, a day after first introducing his choice for vice president in a Friday morning tweet.

The billionaire businessman strode first onto the stage that featured a backdrop of 10 American flags. The event did not feature any new “Trump-Pence” signs, instead displaying the standard “Trump” podium sign.

The presumptive GOP presidential nominee was cheered by a crowd of several hundred friends and local Republicans. He said he would champion “law and order” in the wake of this week’s terror attack in France.

He says of the new Republican ticket, “we are the law and order candidates.”

___

11:10 a.m.

Hillary Clinton’s campaign is seizing on the suggestion that Donald Trump may have wavered in making his vice presidential pick.

Clinton’s campaign released a web video early Saturday highlighting the campaign’s mixed signals and Trump’s contradictory statements about where he was in the selection process in the lead-up to his announcement Friday morning of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

The ad’s tagline says: “Donald Trump. Always divisive. Not so decisive.”

Trump’s campaign has strongly rejected the idea Trump had second thoughts about Pence. Campaign chairman Paul Manafort says Trump “never waffled” once he made his decision.

Trump and Pence are scheduled to make their first joint appearance Saturday morning in New York.

___

10:55 a.m.

Donald Trump is poised to officially name his running mate, Indiana Governor Mike Pence.

Trump and Pence will appear at a midtown Manhattan hotel on Saturday morning. It will be their first joint appearance since Trump announced his pick of Pence on Twitter Friday morning.

Pence is a favorite among Evangelical voters and the Republican Party’s conservative base. He was picked after Trump’s days-long and unusually public deliberation process.

Aides said the two men are not expected to take questions at Saturday’s announcement event.

It will take place in the same ballroom where Hillary Clinton and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio raised eyebrows by making a racially-questionable joke during a charity event this spring.

___

10:44 a.m.

The Northeast might not be the most fertile ground for Republican candidates for national office, but New York, New Jersey and Connecticut will be front-and-center at next week’s Republican National Convention.

Delegates from those states will have prime seats to watch billionaire businessman Donald Trump accept the GOP’s nomination for president.

The delegates from Wyoming, the District of Columbia and Washington state might want to bring binoculars.

Delegates are traditionally seated based on the political importance of their state, and Trump is from New York.

Battleground states Ohio and Florida also have pretty good seats. Oddly, competitive battleground states Colorado and Virginia are in the back.

Much of the leadership of the Never Trump movement is from Colorado, so those delegates might struggle to be heard.

___

3:28 a.m.

His running mate largely unknown to the public, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is introducing Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, a steady conservative with governing experience inside and outside of Washington.

Trump and Pence will appear together Saturday morning at a midtown Manhattan hotel, an unofficial kickoff event to the Republican National Convention two days before it opens in Cleveland.

While Trump showcases his choice, Democrat Hillary Clinton’s team is already painting Pence’s conservative social viewpoints as out of step with the mainstream.

Trump chose Pence in part to ease some Republicans’ concerns about Trump’s temperament and lack of political experience. Pence’s demeanor is as calm as Trump’s is fiery and he brings a sense of discipline that aides and advisers hope can bridge that gap.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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ISTANBUL — Turkey’s government rounded up thousands of military personnel on Saturday said to have taken part in an attempted coup, moving swiftly to re-establish control after a night of chaos and intrigue that left hundreds dead.

By noon, there were few signs that those who had taken part in the coup attempt were still able to challenge the government, and many declared the uprising a failure.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim called the insurrection “a stain in the history of democracy” at a news conference on Saturday in Ankara, the capital. He raised the death toll in the clashes to 265, with 1,440 people wounded, and he said that 2,839 military personnel had been detained.

As the insurrection unfolded Friday night, beginning with the seizure of two bridges in Istanbul by military forces, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was not heard from for hours. He finally addressed the nation from an undisclosed location, speaking on his cellphone’s FaceTime app — a dramatic scene that seemed to suggest a man on the grip of losing power. But in the early hours of Saturday morning, he landed in Istanbul, a strong sign that the coup was failing.

Interactive Feature | Live Updates

Mr. Erdogan placed blame for the intrigue on the followers of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric living in exile in Pennsylvania, who was the president’s ally until a bitter falling out three years ago. Mr. Gulen’s followers were known to have a strong presence in Turkey’s police and judiciary, but less so in the military.

Speaking Saturday morning, Mr. Erdogan said, referring to Mr. Gulen: “I have a message for Pennsylvania: You have engaged in enough treason against this nation. If you dare, come back to your country.”

T

In a statement released on the website of his group, Alliance for Shared Values, Mr. Gulen condemned the coup and supported the country’s democratic process.

“As someone who suffered under multiple military coups during the past five decades, it is especially insulting to be accused of having any link to such an attempt,” Mr. Gulen wrote. “I categorically deny such accusations.

Mr. Erdogan also said that Turkish fighter jets had bombed tanks on the streets of Ankara, and that a military helicopter being used by the coup plotters had been shot down.

There was also a battle early Saturday morning at Turkey’s main intelligence headquarters in Ankara, which was later secured by government forces, and a Turkish official said the intelligence chief, Hakan Fidan, had been taken to a secure location.

In a news conference on Saturday, Turkey’s top military officer, Gen. Umit Dundar, the acting head of the General Staff, said that “the coup attempt was rejected by the chain of command immediately.”

“The people have taken to the streets and voiced their support for democracy,” he said, adding that “the nation will never forget this betrayal.”

As Turkey began waking up after a long and in many ways surreal evening, it appeared that the elected government had re-established control. But many questions remained unanswered, including who exactly was behind the plot and what the longer-term fallout would be to the political system of Turkey, a NATO ally and important partner to the United States in the fight against the Islamic State, also known as ISIS.

The Turkish authorities on Saturday at least temporarily halted American-led strike missions against the Islamic State that were flying from the Incirlik air base, the first major impact of the coup on the broader allied campaign against the terrorist group.

“At this time, Turkish authorities are not permitting aircraft to depart Incirlik,” an American military official said on Saturday morning.

The American official said the United States was seeking an explanation for the decision and other details. The move may reflect a desire by Turkey to control its airspace for a time on Saturday, as opposed to any shift on its policy toward the Islamic State.

Pentagon officials had said late Friday that the unfolding coup had not affected the bombing and surveillance missions from Incirlik, the opening of which to the allies has enabled commanders to accelerate and intensify airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria.

Much of the violence overnight related to the coup attempt was in Ankara, where different branches of the security forces fought one another over control of government buildings, including the Parliament building, where several explosions were reported.

The state-run Anadolu Agency reported that 1,563 soldiers had been arrested. Television footage showed some soldiers, naked from the waist up, being put on a bus in Istanbul.

Early Saturday morning, soldiers surrendered on a bridge that traverses the Bosporus, one of two that the military shut down as the coup attempt began Friday evening. Footage showed abandoned military clothing and helmets along the bridge. The government also moved on a military school in Istanbul, arresting dozens.

Disciplinary actions extended into the judicial system on Saturday as an oversight body, the High Council of Judges and Prosectors, announced that 2,745 judges had been dismissed, the Anadolu agency reported.

Turkey has a long history of military involvement in politics — there have been three coups since 1960 — and as the country became deeply polarized in recent years between supporters of Mr. Erdogan’s Islamist government and those loyal to Turkey’s secular traditions, many wondered if the military would intervene. Some, quietly, had even hoped they would.

But once it came, people in the country, even those bitterly opposed to Mr. Erdogan, seemed to have no desire for a return to military rule. Turks across the political spectrum, including the main opposition parties that represent secular Turks, nationalists and Kurds, opposed the coup. So did many top generals in the armed forces, highlighting that the attempt appeared not to have had deep support, even in the military.

Speaking from Luxembourg during a European tour, Secretary of State John Kerry reiterated the United States’s support for the Erdogan government. “We stand by the government of Turkey,” he said.

Mr. Kerry said it was not surprising that the United States and Turkey’s other NATO allies had not been aware of the coup before it occurred.

“If you’re planning a coup, you don’t exactly advertise it to your partners in NATO,” Mr. Kerry said. “It surprised everybody, including the people in Turkey. I must say it does not appear to be a very brilliantly planned or executed event.”

Mr. Kerry also said that he would listen to any inquiries Turkey might have about Mr. Gulen but that he had not received any requests to extradite him to Turkey.

“We fully anticipate that there will be questions raised about Mr. Gulen,” he said. “And obviously, we invite the government of Turkey, as we always do, to present us with any legitimate evidence that withstands scrutiny, and the United States will accept that and look at it and make judgments about it appropriately.”

Germany’s chancellor, Angela Merkel, and its foreign minister, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, expressed concern about the developments in Turkey and called on a return to the rule of law, under the country’s democratically elected government.

Ms. Merkel said political change should take place only through democratic procedures. “Tanks on the streets and attacks from the air against their own people are against the law,” she said.

Tensions between Germany and Turkey have run high in recent months. Mr. Erdogan was angered by a German comedian’s crude lampooning of him and by Parliament’s adoption last month of a resolution calling the 1915 mass killing of Armenians by Ottoman Turks genocide.

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NICE, France — The man responsible for turning a night of celebration into one of carnage in the seaside city of Nice was a petty criminal who hadn’t been on the radar of French intelligence services before the attack.

As authorities in France frantically search for clues that might indicate a network of supporters of the kind that emerged after the Paris attacks last November, what is known so far about Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel suggests a troubled, angry loner with little interest in Islam.

The 31-year-old was born in Msaken, a town in Tunisia, but moved to France years ago and was living in the country legally, working as a delivery driver.

At an apartment bloc in the Quartier des Abattoirs, on the outskirts of Nice, neighbors described the father of three as a volatile man, prone to drinking and womanizing, and in the process of divorcing his wife.

His father said Bouhlel had violent episodes during which “he broke everything he found around him.”

“Each time he had a crisis, we took him to the doctor who gave him medication,” Mohamed Mondher Lahouaiej Bouhlel told BFM television.

His son hadn’t visited Tunisia in four years and hadn’t stayed in contact with his family, he said.

“What I know is that he didn’t pray, he didn’t go to the mosque, he had no ties to religion,” said the father, noting that Bouhlel didn’t respect the Islamic fasting rituals during the month of Ramadan.

In a news conference Friday, hours after the attack in which 84 people were killed and 202 were wounded, prosecutors said they had found no links to the Islamic State extremist group.

Bouhlel had had a series of run-ins with the law for threatening behavior, violence and theft over the past six years. In March, he was given a six-month suspended sentence by a Nice court for a road-rage incident.

His court-appointed lawyer, Corentin Delobel, said he observed “no radicalization whatsoever,” and Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said Bouhlel was never placed on a watch list for radicals.

Still, Bouhlel could have felt inspired by calls from extremist groups to carry out acts of murder in France, said Molins. Though no group has claimed responsibility for the Nice attack, President Francois Hollande called it “undeniably terrorist in nature” and extended a state of emergency imposed after the Nov. 13 assault on Paris nightspots that claimed 130 lives.

Records show that the 19-ton truck that was rammed through the seaside crowd in Nice was rented in the outskirts of the city on July 11 and overdue on the night of the attack.

About 25 minutes before the July 14 fireworks show, a popular event that draws hundreds of thousands of people to the Nice seafront each year, Bouhlel climbed into the vehicle and drove toward the city center.

Shortly after 10:30 p.m., he drove onto the Promenade des Anglais that had been closed to traffic for the night.

Witnesses described seeing how Bouhlel purposely steered the truck to hit men, women and children as they tried to flee.

“It was such a nice atmosphere before this started,” recalled Sanchia Lambert, a tourist from Sweden who had come to visit family in Nice. “There were people playing drums, kids riding their bikes. That makes what happened all the worse.”

Her husband, John Lambert, said the couple was almost struck by Bouhlel.

“I saw his face,” Lambert told The Associated Press. “He was totally focused.”

Within minutes the attack was over, with Bouhlel dead in a hail of police gunfire. Inside the driver’s cab lay a loaded handgun, three replica firearms and an empty grenade.

Investigators are looking into how Bouhlel acquired the cache of weapons. A series of attacks in recent years have shown that radical jihadi networks are seemingly able to obtain guns, and even heavier automatic weapons, with ease in France.

Nice is home to a sizeable Islamic community, and Muslims were among the victims. It is also the home of Omar Omsen, notorious for his French-language jihadi recruitment videos and now believed to be fighting in Syria.

Fellow Tunisians in Nice said they hoped the attack wouldn’t reflect badly on them.

“It shocks me because here’s a guy who comes from the same town as me,” said hair stylist Morgan Braham, 31. “Today I’m almost ashamed and afraid. It’s not only shame it’s also fear, to tell people that we’re Tunisian.”

____

Philippe Sotto in Nice, Elaine Ganley in Paris and Lori Hinnant in Perigueux, France, contributed to this report.

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By , and Zeynep Karatas,

ISTANBUL — Turkey’s government appears to have defeated a coup attempt by a renegade faction of the military, restoring control on Saturday to the major cities after a night of chaos and clashes that has plunged the already troubled country into uncertainty.

At least 90 people were killed and 1,154 wounded as ordinary Turks poured into the streets to confront tanks amid pitched battles in the main cities.

By morning, government forces had closed in on the army headquarters in Ankara, the final stronghold of coup plotters, said a senior Turkish official who added that 1,563 members of the military have been arrested so far.

The unrest raised fears that Turkey, a close U.S. ally, especially in the fight against the Islamic State, could be destined for a prolonged period of civil strife that would reverberate across an already bloodstained and chaotic region.

Just after dawn and hours of overnight clashes, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan appeared at the Istanbul airport and greeted a huge crowd of flag-waving supporters.

“This government, brought to power by the people, is in charge,” he said.

“Turkey is proud of you,” roared back the crowd.

“A minority group within the armed forces targeted the integrity of our country,” Erdogan told reporters at the news conference broadcast live on state television. “This latest action is an action of treason, and they will have to pay heavily for that.”

Hours earlier, branches of the police and army had fought pitched battles for control of major government buildings in the capital, Ankara, as protesters swarmed onto the streets to confront the tanks rumbling into their cities.

Helicopters flown by coup supporters fired on buildings and into the crowds gathering to challenge the attempt to overthrow Turkey’s government, in the most significant challenge to the country’s stability in decades.

Gruesome video footage posted on social media showed tanks crushing protesters who tried to block their path, bloodied bodies strewn on the streets of Ankara and helicopters firing into civilian crowds, raising fears that the toll could be higher.

By the early hours of Saturday morning, Turkish officials said the government had managed to claw back control from the coup plotters, whose identity and profile remained unclear.

The Interior Ministry reported that five generals and 29 colonels had been removed from their posts.

The army chief of staff, Gen. Hulusi Akar, was rescued from an air base in Ankara where he had been held hostage since the start of the coup, reported Anadolu Saturday morning and would now take over operations.

A Turkish warplane shot down a helicopter carrying some of the coup leaders, the officials also said, and the state broadcaster, which had been silent for several hours after it was overrun by soldiers, was back on the air by morning.

Istanbul Ataturk Airport reopened after being closed for hours and the national airline had resumed flights.

[Turkey’s Erdogan always feared a coup. He was proved right.]

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim issued orders early Saturday to the military aircraft pilots still loyal to the government to take to the skies to shoot down any remaining planes flying on behalf of the coup plotters, who appeared to include a sizable proportion of the air force.

“The situation is largely in control,” Yildirim told Turkey’s NTV television channel. “All commanders are in charge. The people have taken steps to address this threat.”

But with reports that gunfire and explosions were still being heard on the streets of Istanbul and Ankara well into the morning, it was far from clear whether the worst crisis in Turkey in decades had been resolved.

[The coup in Turkey, even if it fails, could lead to uncertainty in anti-ISIS fight]

The splits within the security forces and the chaotic scenes on the streets revealed a society polarized between supporters and opponents of the deeply controversial Erdogan, whose autocratic behavior has alienated some segments of Turkish society but who remains hugely popular among his core constituents.

With the main opposition parties making statements condemning the coup attempt, and most of the important branches of the military and security services rallying to the government’s side, it did not appear that the renegades had widespread support.

The upheaval began Friday evening when tanks and other armored vehicles appeared on bridges across the Bosporous in Istanbul and F-16 fighter jets began streaking through the skies.

Shortly afterward, an anchor with the state television broadcaster read a statement purportedly from the Turkish military saying it had taken control of the country, citing concerns about the increasingly autocratic behavior of Erdogan and his ruling Justice and Development Party.

[Turkey’s increasingly desperate predicament poses real dangers]

“The Turkish Armed Forces, in accordance with the constitution, have seized management of the country to reinstate democracy, human rights, and freedom, and to ensure public order, which has deteriorated,” the statement said.

Erdogan, whose party won a comfortable majority in elections last year, then appealed to his supporters to take to the streets to protest the coup. He spoke to the nation using the FaceTime app on the phone of a Turkish TV anchor.

Many thousands responded, with protesters gathering in venues including Istanbul’s central Taksim Square and outside Erdogan’s palace in Ankara. Mobile phone videos uploaded to social-media sites showed scenes in which people scrambled over tanks to try to block their path and soldiers opening fire on some of the crowds.

Turkish officials blamed the coup attempt on a small group of disgruntled military officers loyal to the movement of a U.S.-based cleric, Fethullah Gulen, who maintains a network of adherents across Turkey and has long challenged Erdogan’s hold on power. The officers were destined to lose their jobs in August during a military reshuffle, said the Turkish official.

The Gulenist movement denied involvement, however, and amid the confusion, it was impossible to confirm who was behind the attempt to topple the government.

Erdogan has made many enemies in the 13 years he has run Turkey, first as prime minister and then, since 2014, as president, including within the military. Hundreds of officers have been imprisoned by his government, some of them accused of coup-plotting, and it had been widely thought that his crackdown on dissent had dispelled the risk of coups in the once coup-prone country.

These latest coup plotters included members of the air force and gendarmerie, inluding 13 officers who tried to force their way into the presidential palace, according to the Turkish official.

Sly reported from Irbil, Iraq. Ishaan Tharoor in Washington, Carol Morello in Moscow and Menekse Tokyay in Ankara contributed to this report.

Read more:

Turkey’s cat-and-mouse game with the Islamic State

Turkey’s most-read newspaper begins publishing pro-Erdogan articles after government seizure

Today’s coverage from Post correspondents around the world

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NICE, France — He lived on the 12th floor of a high rise in a heavily immigrant housing project and was known to his neighbors only as a moody and aggressive oddball. He never went to the local mosque, often grunted in response to greetings of “bonjour” and sometimes beat his wife — until she threw him out.

The French authorities had much the same view of the man, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, a heavyset 31-year-old from Tunisia — definitely trouble but not a grave menace to the security of the nation.

At 10:45 on Thursday evening, however, Mr. Bouhlel was starting an attack that would stun and horrify his old neighbors, the French security forces and much of the world: stepping on the accelerator of a 19-ton refrigerated truck he had rented, he turned the vehicle into a highly efficient instrument of mass murder.

Zigzagging so as to hit as many people as possible as the vehicle careered down the Promenade des Anglais, alongside the Mediterranean, Mr. Bouhlel transformed the celebrated French Riviera boulevard, crammed with people who had just watched a fireworks show celebrating Bastille Day, into a vast tableau of carnage and panic.

By the end of his murderous drive, when he was shot to death by the police, 84 lifeless bodies were left scattered behind him and scores of others lay gravely wounded.

“We were all like zombies, just running and screaming,” recalled Alexia Carbonne, a 20-year-old who had gone out Thursday evening with a girlfriend to watch the fireworks.

The dead included 10 children and teenagers, François Molins, the prosecutor who oversees terrorism cases, said on Friday.

Among the victims were two German students and their teacher; two Americans; two Tunisians, and one Russian. Of the 202 people wounded, 52 had serious injuries and 25 were in intensive care, Mr. Molins said.

His rampage-by-truck, the third large-scale act of terrorism in France in a year and a half, highlighted the difficulties of guarding against unconventional attacks.

Yet it also left the French government facing uncomfortable questions about whether it had provided sufficient security in Nice even as it urged citizens to recognize that the terrorist threat would not be eradicated quickly or easily.

“I want to tell my fellow countrymen that we will win this war, but that we might be faced with new retaliations, that there will probably be more innocent victims,” said Prime Minister Manuel Valls.

Mr. Bouhlel appeared not to have left behind any public declaration of his motive or indicated any allegiance to the Islamic State or another extremist group. Unusually for an attack of this scale and nature, no group claimed responsibility.

Interactive Feature | ‘There’s Something That’s Not Right. Someone Lost Control of Their Truck.’ Survivors of the attack in Nice, France, describe a windy night at the beach, fireworks, and then terror.

He had a history of petty crime, including a six-month suspended sentence for assaulting a motorist last year. But he was never flagged as a potential jihadist radical and, Mr. Molins said, he was “completely unknown by intelligence services, both at the national and local levels.”

The lawyer who defended Mr. Bouhlel in last year’s assault case, Corentin Delobel, described his former client as “a classic delinquent” in an interview with France’s BFM televisions news channel.

Still, French officials labeled the attack terrorism and cast the episode as the latest in a series that have made France a battlefield in the violent clash between Islamic extremists and the West.

The tool he chose for his attack, a speeding vehicle, also fits with a 2014 exhortation by Abu Muhammad al-Adnani, the spokesman for the Islamic State, to would-be jihadists who wanted to kill French or American citizens but did not have any bombs to hand.

“Smash his head with a rock or slaughter him with a knife or run him over with your car,” Mr. Adnani advised.

Mr. Valls said the attacker in all likelihood had ties to radical Islamist circles.

“He is a terrorist probably linked to radical Islam one way or another,” Mr. Valls told France 2 television.

Interactive Feature | Latest Updates

Bernard Cazeneuve, France’s interior minister, was more cautious.

“We have an individual who was not at all known by the intelligence services for activities linked to radical Islamism,” Mr. Cazeneuve said, noting that he was not in any French intelligence databases for those suspected of radicalization.

He said that the ongoing investigation would determine whether the suspect had acted alone, possibly because of he was psychologically “unbalanced,” or whether he was linked to a terrorist network.

Residents in his former apartment building on a hill overlooking the city said they had never seen him at the local mosque and never heard him mention religion.

Indeed, they said he rarely spoke at all and seemed to be in a permanent haze of anger, particularly after his marriage fell apart.

Samir Boufet, an 18-year-old resident in the building, remembered him as a “big guy who clearly had lots of problems. He never spoke with anyone.”

A friend of Mr. Boufet’s, who gave his name as Walid Ben, said Mr. Bouhlel had a reputation in the neighborhood as a wife beater and always seemed in a foul mood.

The French police on Thursday raided two locations in Nice looking for clues to his motivations and possible links to extremist groups. One was the 13-floor apartment building where Mr. Bouhlal had lived with his wife and three children.

The other was a small apartment in the east of Nice — near the city’s former slaughterhouse — to which he moved about a year ago after his wife demanded they live separately.

Near the second residence, forensic experts in chemical hazard suits clambered in and out of a truck parked by the side of the road. Painted on its back was the address of a showroom in St.-Laurent-du-Var, a town adjacent to the Nice airport.

Local residents said the truck had been used by Mr. Bouhlel for his work as a delivery man at the showroom.

But the manager there, John Neto, said the terrorist had never worked for him and that the truck was used by an entirely different man whom he declined to name.

Mr. Bouhlel rented the refrigerated truck he deployed as a killing machine on Monday at a rental company just down the road from the showroom.

Interactive Map | A Trail of Terror in Nice, Block by Block Documenting devastation along a one-mile stretch of waterfront.

A female manager on duty at the company said Friday he had provided all the required documents, including a special permit allowing him to use a heavy vehicle.

The woman, who declined to give her name, said that Mr. Bouhlel had aroused no suspicions.

But she said she had grown increasingly worried that her truck was being used as a weapon while watching television reports of Thursday evening of the scene on the Promenade des Anglais.

She then got a call from the police asking her to give information about who had rented the truck and how.

At 9:34 p.m. on Thursday, according to surveillance footage, Mr. Bouhlel arrived by bicycle to collect the rented truck and then drove it into the center of Nice, arriving at 10:30 p.m. in the Magnan neighborhood, just north of the Promenade des Anglais.

His deadly rampage began around 15 minutes later, when he drove the truck south and, after passing a children’s hospital where his young victims now lie, he then turned onto the promenade, which was packed with spectators watching the end of the Bastille Day fireworks.

Mr. Bouhlel initially ran over two people, including a middle-aged Muslim woman, on the sidewalk, and then continued driving for 1.1 miles eastward, running over people left and right as he swerved on and off the sidewalk.

Outside the Negresco Hotel, Mr. Bouhlel fired at three police officers; they returned fire, and then pursued Mr. Bouhlel for about 1,000 feet, until they shot and killed him outside a Hyatt hotel and casino.

He was found dead in the passenger seat. In the truck’s cab, police found an automatic 7.65-millimeter pistol, a cartridge clip, and several cartridges. They also found a fake automatic pistol; two fake assault rifles, a Kalashnikov and an M-16; a nonfunctioning grenade; and a mobile phone and documents.

On a visit to Nice, President François Hollande defended his government against mounting criticism that it had slipped up.

Praising security services, he said they had “taken all necessary measures so that this fireworks show might be as protected as possible — as had been the case during the European Championship soccer tournament.”

“Why Nice?” Mr. Hollande asked. “Because it is a city that is known worldwide, one of the most beautiful cities on the planet,” he said.

“Why on the 14th of July? Because it is a celebration of freedom. It was, therefore, indeed to affect France that the individual committed this terrorist attack.”

Hours before the attack Thursday evening, Mr. Hollande had said that a state of emergency put in place after the Nov. 13 attacks in and around Paris would end soon.

The government will now seek to extend the state of emergency for three months.

As France announced three days of national mourning, starting on Saturday, world leaders — from Pope Francis and President Obama to Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany and Britain’s new prime minister, Theresa May — expressed sympathy and outrage.

It was a sadly familiar ritual for France, where a total of 147 people were killed in terrorist attacks in and around Paris in January and November of last year, and it raised new questions throughout the world about the ability of extremists to sow terror.

The internet reverberated with calls for prayer for victims of attacks in Brussels, Istanbul, Orlando, Fla., Baghdad and other cities struck by mass terrorism attributed to Islamist extremists this year.

Struck down at the height of the summer tourism season, Nice on Friday stumbled on as if in a daze, its normally crowded seaside restaurants and luxury hotels mostly closed as armed police officers blocked entry to much of the Promenade des Anglais, still littered in places with surgical gloves, bloody clothing, and other detritus of the previous night’s terror.

Late on Friday evening, a long caravan of police vehicles drove slowly down the promenade away from the city center, leaving the wide, crescent-shaped boulevard open to pedestrians and cars once again. Makeshift memorials set up where Mr. Bouhlel’s victims had fallen drew groups of silent mourners and ever growing piles of white carnations.

“The horror, the horror has, once again, hit France,” Mr. Hollande told the nation early Friday morning before leaving for Nice.

“France has been struck on the day of her national holiday,” he said. “Human rights are denied by fanatics, and France is clearly their target.”

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