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Hillary Clinton’s claim of a narrow victory in Kentucky and Bernie Sanders’ win in Oregon illustrated a deepening rift among Democrats with the potential to hobble the party heading into the general election.

The split outcome in Tuesday’s primaries gives Clinton little leverage to push Sanders to unify his supporters behind her in preparation for an expected campaign against presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump, who is using the extended primary contest to attack Clinton’s standing with her own party.

Sanders showed no intention of dialing back his fight against Clinton or urging his supporters to fall in line. His spokesman said Sanders is considering seeking a recount in Kentucky, where Clinton was clinging to a lead of a half percentage point.

“We are in until the last ballot is cast,” Sanders told supporters at a rally in Carson, California, saying he believes he can win the June 7 primary in the nation’s most populous state. “We have the possibility — it will be a steep climb, I recognize that — but we have the possibility of going to Philadelphia with the majority of the pledged delegates,” Sanders said of the July nominating convention. He said in early general election poll match-ups he does “much better against Trump” than Clinton.

Clinton has 96 percent of the delegates and superdelegates needed to clinch the nomination, according to an Associated Press estimate Wednesday. Sanders has 64 percent. He’d need to win about two-thirds of the rest of the pledged delegates to pull even with Clinton by the end of the nominating race, according to AP.

With her lead in the nomination race all but insurmountable, Clinton and party leaders had been looking to take advantage of a split in the Republican Party over Trump that has been opening since the start of the primary campaign. Instead, they’re dealing with their own divisions. That was illustrated with an eruption by Sanders’ supporters during last weekend’s state party convention in Nevada.

Throwing Chairs

Some Sanders backers threw chairs and shouted down speakers during the convention, at which Clinton was awarded a majority of delegates, in a dispute over rules. The chairwoman of the Nevada Democratic Party was subjected to threatening messages on her voicemail.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat, said Tuesday he spoke to Sanders about the incidents and that he was confident the Vermont senator would speak out against violence by his supporters. He called it a “test of leadership.”

Sanders responded with a statement saying that Democratic leaders must “understand that the political world is changing and that millions of Americans are outraged” at the political and economic establishment.

“It is imperative that all state parties treat our campaign supporters with fairness and the respect that they have earned” if Democrats are to win in November, Sanders said, adding that “it goes without saying that I condemn” any violence or personal harassment.

Later, at his rally in California, Sanders suggested there would be consequences for Democratic Party leaders if they don’t change its rules to expand participation for independents and newcomers.

“Open the doors; let the people in,” Sanders said, after supporters booed the mention of the Democratic Party. He added that “before we will have the opportunity to defeat Donald Trump we’re going to have to defeat Secretary Clinton.”

Adding Fuel

Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz told CNN on Tuesday night that Sanders’ response “added more fuel to the fire.”

The Nevada state Democratic Party said in a statement that the Sanders campaign was being “dishonest about what happened Saturday and is failing to adequately denounce the threats of violence of his supporters.”

“We believe, unfortunately, that the tactics and behavior on display here in Nevada are harbingers of things to come as Democrats gather in Philadelphia in July for our National Convention,” the state party’s lawyer wrote in a formal complaint to the Democratic National Committee.

Democrats, including some of Sanders’ Senate colleagues, piled up complaints and admonitions to allow Clinton to concentrate on a general-election fight against Trump.

“He needs to tell whoever is conducting this violence that it is completely anathema to his own values, that he calls on them to stop it, that it’s anathema to our party’s values and to our country’s values, and I hope that he will,” said Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia, a Clinton supporter. “A primary can be a very good thing but at the end of the day there is a winner, and then it is really important for people to pull together, because the stakes are existential in November to virtually every value that Bernie Sanders cares about.”

Echo of 2008

The Clinton campaign can take comfort in some of the patterns that played out in Barack Obama’s win over her in the 2008 nomination race. That year, Senator John McCain had the Republican nomination locked down by March while Clinton kept Obama fighting in the primaries until June. She won most of those last contests, but Obama went on to win the nomination and the presidency. But Clinton’s position in the Democratic establishment gave her a clearer imperative to unify the party in 2008 than Sanders has in his outsider role.

Sanders has been on a winning streak lately, taking 11 of the last 19 contests. But Clinton’s early wins in larger states and advantage with Democratic superdelegates have made it mathematically near-impossible for Sanders to catch up to her in the delegate count.

While Kentucky isn’t likely to be a swing state in November, problems there for Clinton may foreshadow difficulties in parts of Ohio and Pennsylvania. Any additional wins for Sanders, meanwhile, give him more standing to demand concessions from the party, in order to bring over his supporters even if he cannot secure the nomination. 

“The question now for a few weeks has been what does Sanders really want,” said Jennifer Duffy, an analyst at the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. “While Clinton has pretty handily won this nomination she does need his voters. They’d have to give Sanders something that inspires his supporters for lack of a better word.”

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As Oregon and Kentucky queue up to vote in the Democratic presidential nominating contest, the pall of a divisive state party convention in Nevada hangs over the race.

Supporters of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders were accused of throwing chairs and making death threats against Nevada Democratic Party chairwoman Roberta Lange. They contended that the party leadership rigged the results of the convention, which locked in seven more delegates who pledged to support Hillary Clinton, compared with the five Sanders gained. The raucous affair ended Saturday night when security at the Paris Las Vegas casino said they could no longer ensure an orderly event.

“It was beyond the pale,” said Democratic state Sen. Pat Spearman, a Clinton supporter who said she saw an elderly woman hit with a bottle amid the ruckus. “There’s no reason to do that. That’s the kind of shenanigans that they do on the other side.”

On Monday the ugliness continued as the Nevada Democratic Party kept its offices closed for security reasons and wrote a letter to the Democratic National Committee warning of what it called the Sanders campaign’s “penchant for extra-parliamentary behavior — indeed, actual violence — in place of democratic conduct in a convention setting.” The party’s lawyer, Bradley S. Schrager, said that Sanders supporters may use similar tactics at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia this summer.

The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said Monday that it “is investigating threats being made to the Democratic office/members.”

The Nevada dissension does not change the likely outcome of the Democratic nominating contest, in which Clinton holds a commanding lead in pledged delegates and is expected to lock up enough to clinch the party’s presidential nomination following primaries on June 7. But it points to the challenges Clinton will face in converting Sanders supporters to her side as Trump also targets disaffected Democrats who supported the Vermont senator.

Trump has repeatedly talked about how Sanders is being treated poorly by the party establishment, and his aides suggest he could make inroads among some of the voters who have backed Sanders’ insurgent bid. Sanders himself often criticizes Trump as a racist in his stump speech, but he has said the responsibility for Democratic unity lies largely with Clinton.

Clinton has been preaching unity. After notching a big win in Pennsylvania’s primary on April 26, she said, “Whether you support Sen. Sanders or support me, there’s much more that unites us than divides us.”

Steve Schale, a Florida consultant who ran Barack Obama’s campaigns in that state, said he thinks Sanders voters will return to the fold. He said that Clinton is winning a larger share of Democratic votes in current polling than Obama did at this point in 2008.

“Empirically, despite the public acrimony that’s going on between volunteers, the data says we’re going into this more unified than we were eight years ago,” Schale said.

Nevada was the third state to vote in the Democratic nominating contest, but it has continued to be a flashpoint for months. Clinton won the February statewide Nevada caucuses 53-47. But Sanders supporters flooded county conventions that would select delegates to Saturday’s state convention, hoping to give their candidate an edge on actual delegates who would be sent to Philadelphia.

Sanders issued a statement on Friday night calling for backers to work together “respectfully and constructively” at Saturday’s convention. But Sanders’ supporters did not seem to heed his advice. They booed when a set of convention rules was adopted over their objections, forcing Lange to bang the gavel in futile attempts to restore order.

“So many of these young people who have worked so hard want to make the country a better place, and I feel like they were shut out,” said Erin Bilbray, a Sanders supporter who’s one of Nevada’s eight superdelegates. “I was really, really heartbroken.”

Anger swelled further after a credentials committee disqualified nearly 60 would-be Sanders’ delegates, saying they didn’t provide proper identifying information or were not registered Democratic voters by a May 1 deadline. The Clinton campaign turned out 33 more supporters to the convention than the Sanders campaign, enough to cement a 20-15 edge among Nevada delegates heading to Philadelphia.

As the event dragged on three hours past its scheduled end, hotel security said they could no longer staff the event and it was closed down.

In a statement, the state party accused the Sanders campaign of “deliberately sharing misinformation about how the convention operates to get people riled up. And after starting this fire, they had no capacity ?—? and no desire ?—? to control their own supporters from hurling threats and insults and being disruptive to the proceedings.”

Tick Segerblom, a Nevada state senator and Sanders backer, said in an interview Monday that he didn’t think the state party did anything improper but that it needed to reach out to the Sanders’ supporters.

“They need to know the process was fair,” Segerblom said. “When one side says it wasn’t fair, you tend to listen to that.”

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Story highlights

  • Republicans are battling for 155 delegates in Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Maine
  • Democrats are going to the polls in Kansas, Louisiana and Nebraska with 109 pledged delegates at stake

Republicans are battling for 155 delegates in Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Maine while Democrats are going to the polls in Kansas, Louisiana and Nebraska with 109 pledged delegates at stake.

Early indications were that voting in Kansas particularly was brisk. Reports from dozens of county locations indicate that Republican turnout was often four or five times that of 2012 and growing, said state party chair Kelly Arnold.

The new round of voting comes amid an uproar in the Republican Party over the increasing likelihood that Trump will emerge as the GOP nominee. The party appears on the verge of tearing itself apart over the prospect. Mitt Romney, the GOP’s 2012 nominee, and other party elders launched an unprecedented effort this week to thwart Trump’s campaign.

Clinton, meanwhile, is looking to further cement her lead over her challenger Bernie Sanders, though the Vermont senator will be encouraged by the fact that the contests in Kansas and Nebraska are caucuses, a format in which he has tended to perform better than primaries during the 2016 campaign.

The “Super Saturday” contests offer a chance for the two front-runners to quicken their momentum after they both came out of the Super Tuesday contests last week with solid delegate leads. They still face major battles in crucial elections in Michigan, Ohio and Florida over the coming weeks.

READ: Inside Ted Cruz’s plan to sink Marco Rubio in Florida

The races on Saturday will test whether there’s any fallout from a wild week in Republican politics, which included Romney’s attacks on Trump and a raucous Fox News debate in which the candidates mostly yelled over one another and Trump boasted about the size of his genitals.

Louisiana political analyst Silas Lee told CNN on Saturday that his state could reflect the underlying trends shaping the wider Republican race.

“It looks like Louisiana will follow the trends with the previous results from Super Tuesday, whereby Clinton will win by a significant margin,” Lee said. “With the Republicans, it looks like Trump.”

Clinton has a lead of about 200 pledged delegates over Sanders, while Trump leads Texas Sen. Ted Cruz by around 100 delegates and is about 200 delegates ahead of the third place candidate Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida.

Polling in most of Saturday’s contests has been sketchy, though on the Republican side, Trump has led most of the surveys that do exist and has undeniable momentum after Super Tuesday.

The billionaire took to Twitter on Saturday ahead of a day of campaigning in Kansas and Florida, after stopping in Louisiana on Friday night.

“This is a movement like our GREAT COUNTRY has never seen before!” Trump tweeted.

Trump decided at the last minute to campaign in Kansas on Saturday, and to snub the annual gathering of activists at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) outside Washington.

Saturday’s voting also offers yet another chance for Rubio and Cruz to try to build a comeback as they attempt to deprive Trump of the nomination. The other remaining GOP candidate, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, is concentrating on his own state ahead of its crucial winner-takes-all election on March 15.

A Cruz campaign official, meanwhile, told CNN’s Sunlen Serfaty that the Texas senator’s camp was “optimistic” about adding to his delegate tally across the night’s contests and of widening the gap to Rubio.

Saturday’s clashes between Clinton and Sanders, and a Democratic caucus in Maine on Sunday, will set the stage for the CNN Democratic debate on Sunday night in Flint, Michigan. The state also holds Republican and Democratic primaries on Tuesday.

CNN’s Sunlen Serfaty and Mary Rose Fox contributed to this report

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WASHINGTON—Voters in Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Maine go to the polls Saturday to weigh in on the tumultuous Republican presidential campaign, as front-runner Donald Trump’s rivals scramble to pick up delegates anywhere they can to slow his gathering momentum.

Democrats, meanwhile, will be voting in three states Saturday—Kansas, Louisiana and Nebraska—as front-runner Hillary Clinton seeks to widen her delegate lead over rival…

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WASHINGTON—Voters in Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Maine go to the polls Saturday to weigh in on the tumultuous Republican presidential campaign, as front-runner Donald Trump’s rivals scramble to pick up delegates anywhere they can to slow his gathering momentum.

Democrats, meanwhile, will be voting in three states Saturday—Kansas, Louisiana and Nebraska—as front-runner Hillary Clinton seeks to widen her delegate lead over rival…

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WASHINGTON—Voters in Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Maine go to the polls Saturday to weigh in on the tumultuous Republican presidential campaign, as front-runner Donald Trump’s rivals scramble to pick up delegates anywhere they can to slow his gathering momentum.

Democrats, meanwhile, will be voting in three states Saturday—Kansas, Louisiana and Nebraska—as front-runner Hillary Clinton seeks to widen her delegate lead over rival…

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption Susan Walsh/AP

Within hours of Justice Antonin Scalia’s death, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell aimed to squashed any expectation that President Obama will get to name his successor.

“The American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice,” he said in a statement. “Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president.”

McConnell wants to make sure the next president is a Republican. But even more than that, McConnell wants to make sure that Republicans retain control of the U.S. Senate.

Last month at the annual Republican retreat, McConnell made clear that it was his intention to steer the Senate this year to protect his incumbents. Until Scalia’s death, that meant keeping to a modest legislative agenda, passing necessary spending bills and allowing senators plenty of time back home to campaign this year.

A potentially nasty Senate fight over replacing Scalia was not part of McConnell’s 2016 road map.

Now, the open question is whether Republicans’ refusal to consider a Supreme Court nominee will blow back on those same incumbents McConnell is trying to protect.

The 2016 presidential contest has sucked up the nation’s political oxygen, but beneath that marquee race is a broader fight for control of the Senate, the outcome of which will be hugely consequential for the next president. And that battle for control runs directly through the presidential battleground states — which means Republicans’ ability to hold the Senate depends on incumbents winning re-election in states Barack Obama carried in 2008 and 2012.

Republicans control the Senate 54-46. (There are two independent senators who caucus with Democrats.) Democrats need to win five seats outright, or four seats and the White House, to take control away from the GOP.

This task should be easier than it has been in recent election years, because the 2016 electoral landscape tilts in Democrats’ favor from the start. The party is defending fewer competitive seats, and Democratic voters are more likely to show up in presidential election years.

Republicans are defending seven seats in Florida, Illinois, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. President Obama won all but North Carolina in 2012, though though he did win the state in 2008.

Only two of those GOP senators, Florida’s Marco Rubio and New Hampshire’s Kelly Ayotte, have so far embraced McConnell’s call to postpone the nomination process. And Rubio is running for president and not for Senate re-election.

Meanwhile, in red states, blocking Obama is good politics. The conservative base reviles the thought of a Democratic president picking the successor of a conservative justice.

Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby said Saturday he will “adamantly oppose” any effort by Obama to fill the seat. But Shelby faces only a March 1 primary challenge from the right. If he wins his primary, his re-election in November is not in question.

But Ayotte, Ohio’s Rob Portman and Pennsylvania’s Pat Toomey, for instance, have a trickier path to re-election. They are running in states that tilt Democratic in presidential election years, and they’re facing voters increasingly tired of Washington incumbents, obstructionists and partisans.

These GOP senators have worked hard to cultivate common-sense reputations back home. That strategy was on track until an iconic conservative Supreme Court justice died, injecting a flashpoint into the 2016 races that may pit Republicans between their party’s base and the voters they need to win reelection.

How this plays out depends on who Obama picks to enter this nomination fight. He pledged Saturday evening to announce a nominee “in due time” and challenged GOP assertions that the country should wait over a year to fill the vacancy.

“These are responsibilities that I take seriously, as should everyone. They’re bigger than any one party. They are about our democracy,” Obama said.

It’s a safe bet that the president will name a qualified nominee, then use his bully pulpit to try to shame the GOP-controlled Senate for obstruction. The fight will only intensify if the nominee is a woman or a minority, or both.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., is ready for it. Reid is retiring, but Democrats need to hold his seat if they stand a chance at winning the Senate.

“Failing to fill this vacancy would be a shameful abdication of one of the Senate’s most essential Constitutional responsibilities,” Reid said Saturday.

Scalia’s death did not fundamentally change the Senate landscape, but it has shifted the attention to races that had, until now, been unfolding backstage to the presidential race.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption Susan Walsh/AP

Within hours of Justice Antonin Scalia’s death, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell aimed to squashed any expectation that President Obama will get to name his successor.

“The American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice,” he said in a statement. “Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president.”

McConnell wants to make sure the next president is a Republican. But even more than that, McConnell wants to make sure that Republicans retain control of the U.S. Senate.

Last month at the annual Republican retreat, McConnell made clear that it was his intention to steer the Senate this year to protect his incumbents. Until Scalia’s death, that meant keeping to a modest legislative agenda, passing necessary spending bills and allowing senators plenty of time back home to campaign this year.

A potentially nasty Senate fight over replacing Scalia was not part of McConnell’s 2016 road map.

Now, the open question is whether Republicans’ refusal to consider a Supreme Court nominee will blow back on those same incumbents McConnell is trying to protect.

The 2016 presidential contest has sucked up the nation’s political oxygen, but beneath that marquee race is a broader fight for control of the Senate, the outcome of which will be hugely consequential for the next president. And that battle for control runs directly through the presidential battleground states — which means Republicans’ ability to hold the Senate depends on incumbents winning re-election in states Barack Obama carried in 2008 and 2012.

Republicans control the Senate 54-46. (There are two independent senators who caucus with Democrats.) Democrats need to win five seats outright, or four seats and the White House, to take control away from the GOP.

This task should be easier than it has been in recent election years, because the 2016 electoral landscape tilts in Democrats’ favor from the start. The party is defending fewer competitive seats, and Democratic voters are more likely to show up in presidential election years.

Republicans are defending seven seats in Florida, Illinois, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. President Obama won all but North Carolina in 2012, though though he did win the state in 2008.

Only two of those GOP senators, Florida’s Marco Rubio and New Hampshire’s Kelly Ayotte, have so far embraced McConnell’s call to postpone the nomination process. And Rubio is running for president and not for Senate re-election.

Meanwhile, in red states, blocking Obama is good politics. The conservative base reviles the thought of a Democratic president picking the successor of a conservative justice.

Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby said Saturday he will “adamantly oppose” any effort by Obama to fill the seat. But Shelby faces only a March 1 primary challenge from the right. If he wins his primary, his re-election in November is not in question.

But Ayotte, Ohio’s Rob Portman and Pennsylvania’s Pat Toomey, for instance, have a trickier path to re-election. They are running in states that tilt Democratic in presidential election years, and they’re facing voters increasingly tired of Washington incumbents, obstructionists and partisans.

These GOP senators have worked hard to cultivate common-sense reputations back home. That strategy was on track until an iconic conservative Supreme Court justice died, injecting a flashpoint into the 2016 races that may pit Republicans between their party’s base and the voters they need to win reelection.

How this plays out depends on who Obama picks to enter this nomination fight. He pledged Saturday evening to announce a nominee “in due time” and challenged GOP assertions that the country should wait over a year to fill the vacancy.

“These are responsibilities that I take seriously, as should everyone. They’re bigger than any one party. They are about our democracy,” Obama said.

It’s a safe bet that the president will name a qualified nominee, then use his bully pulpit to try to shame the GOP-controlled Senate for obstruction. The fight will only intensify if the nominee is a woman or a minority, or both.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., is ready for it. Reid is retiring, but Democrats need to hold his seat if they stand a chance at winning the Senate.

“Failing to fill this vacancy would be a shameful abdication of one of the Senate’s most essential Constitutional responsibilities,” Reid said Saturday.

Scalia’s death did not fundamentally change the Senate landscape, but it has shifted the attention to races that had, until now, been unfolding backstage to the presidential race.

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Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said today he is suspending his 2016 campaign for president.

“It’s been an incredible honor to run a principled campaign for the White House,” Paul said in a statement. “Today, I will end where I began, ready and willing to fight for the cause of liberty.

Paul finished fifth in Monday’s Iowa caucuses with 4.5 percent of the vote, behind rivals Ted Cruz, Donald Trump, Marco Rubio and Ben Carson.

Paul campaigned on defending liberty and shrinking the federal government’s influence in the United States and abroad. Paul was seen as a possible mainstream libertarian alternative to his father, the former Texas congressman and presidential candidate Ron Paul.

Since announcing his candidacy on April 7, 2015, in Louisville, Kentucky, Paul was unsuccessful in breaking single digits in national polls. After his disappointing finish in Iowa, it appears Paul began making plans to exit the race.

“Some of the staff found out yesterday, the rest found out this morning,” a source close to Paul’s campaign in New Hampshire told ABC News. “Obviously people here at the office are disappointed, but we think his message will continue to resonate with the freedom movement in the Republican Party.”

The man who was dubbed “The Most Interesting Man in Politics” by Time magazine in 2014 wasn’t able to capture the electorate’s attention, even in states like New Hampshire where his libertarian positions have broader appeal.

Paul, 53, was one of the earliest and strongest voices against GOP front-runner Trump on or off the debate stage, calling the billionaire real estate mogul from New York everything from a “fake conservative” to a “delusional narcissist.” He even compared Trump to “Gollum,” the antagonist in “The Lord of the Rings.”

Paul’s campaign focused on gaining grassroots momentum among younger, first-time voters and college students.

Back home in Kentucky, Paul will be gearing up for a re-election campaign where he will be facing off against the Democratic mayor of Lexington, Jim Gray.

ABC’s Brad Mielke contributed reporting.

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Republican Matt Bevin has won the election for Kentucky governor, the Associated Press reports.

Bluegrass State voters took to the polls on Tuesday to elect Bevin, who will replace outgoing Gov. Steve Beshear (D). He defeated Democrat Jack Conway and Independent candidate Drew Curtis.

Bevin, only the second Republican elected to Kentucky’s highest office in 40 years, is best known for his tea party-backed challenge to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in the 2014 GOP primary for Kentucky’s Senate race. He announced his run for governor in January, going on to defeat other Republican gubernatorial hopefuls, including former state Supreme Court Justice Will Scott and State Agriculture Commissioner James Comer.

Conway, who first announced his intent to run for governor in May 2014, has served as Kentucky’s attorney general since 2008. He ran against Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) in 2010 and lost. Before that, he was a private attorney. 

Conway and Bevin took part in several heated exchanges leading up to Election Day, with The Courier-Journal reporting the tea partier accused Conway of “lying” during a recent debate.

The two have clashed on issues that have received national attention in recent months, including Rowan County clerk Kim Davis’ refusal to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Bevin gave Davis his “absolute” backing. Conway, however, said he was open to creating a narrowly drafted plan providing a religious objections exemption for officials like Davis, The Associated Press reports.

This election has also put Medicaid expansion in the spotlight, the AP reported last month. Bevin pushed to repeal and replace Kynect, Kentucky’s health coverage program, while Conway argued to continue the Medicaid expansion — which saw twice as many people signed up in the first year as state officials had predicted — unchanged.

As HuffPost’s Jeff Young reported, one consequence of Bevin’s victory is that about 400,000 Kentucky residents who qualify for Medicaid under the expansion are now at risk of losing their health insurance.

Kentucky has long been considered a red state, with voters choosing Republican candidate Mitt Romney over incumbent President Barack Obama by 22 percentage points in the 2012 elections, FiveThirtyEight notes.

The Monday before Election Day, HuffPost Pollster showed Conway leading Bevin by a small margin:
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