believes

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GREEN BAY, Wisc. — Donald Trump believes that there should be punishment for women who undergo abortions if the procedure was outlawed, but indicated he has yet to determine what that punishment should be.

In an exclusive interview with MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, the GOP front-runner described himself multiple times as “pro-life” but struggled to define what the legal ramifications of that position should be. When continually pressed for what the answer is regarding punishing women who would break any theoretical ban, Trump said the “answer is that there has to be some form of punishment, yeah.”

When asked what kind of punishment he had in mind, Trump lacked specifics and said he has “not determined what the punishment would be.” Trump noted that he does “take positions on everything else but this is a very complicated position.”

“If you say abortion is a crime or abortion is murder, you have to deal with it under the law,” Matthews stated, making the pivot from the moral position of being pro-life to the practical implications of implementing that position in the law.

Trump asked Matthews “are you going to say, well wait, are you going to say put them in jail? Is that the punishment you’re talking about?”

Matthews responded that that’s the question he was asking the front-runner himself. Trump responded that he was pro-life.

The MSNBC host followed up wondering if a man should bear responsibility for abortions as well, to which Trump said “no” he didn’t think so.

Trump asked repeatedly about the Catholic church’s position on abortion, at multiple points trying to turn the questions on the interviewer himself in relation to how he squared the moral position of the church with the real life implications.

Should the United States change the law of the land on abortion as set by the landmark SCOTUS ruling Roe vs Wade Trump says “you’ll go back to a position like they had where people will, perhaps, go to illegal places.” Still, he maintains “you have to ban it.”

After the interview, the Trump campaign released a statement from the candidate saying: “This issue is unclear and should be put back into the states for determination. Like Ronald Reagan, I am pro- life with exceptions, which I have outlined numerous times.”

Ohio Republican John Kasich, who participated in an MSNBC town hall moderated by NBC’s Chuck Todd earlier in the day, was asked if he agreed with Trump on the prospect of punishing women for abortion. “Absolutely not,” Kasich responded. “I do have exceptions for rape, incest and life of the mother but of course women shouldn’t be punished,” he added.

In Wednesday’s town hall meeting, Trump also continued the defense of his campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, saying that he didn’t think an initial apology from his campaign manager would’ve changed the current situation.

“I think if he called up to apologize I think we’d be in the exact same place,” he told Matthews, wondering if Lewandowski may have even apologized in the moment. “They’re destroying a very good person…over nothing” Trump said. “He’s a good person with a wonderful family.”

Trump called the incident in question “so minor” before continuing to discredit former Brietbart reporter Michelle Fields by attacking the premise of her story. “What’s contact?” he hedged, noting that her facial expression didn’t change despite saying she was almost pulled to the ground by Lewandowski. Trump later added that he was “skeptical” about her.

Related: Trump on Campaign Manager — “I can’t Destroy a Man.”

The GOP front-runner says “nobody respects women” more than he does. That respect, however, doesn’t necessarily translate to Fields. “I would say I don’t have great respect for her,” Trump told Matthews. He also dodged when asked why he didn’t have sympathy for Fields, instead pointing out that the tape being used by the police investigation was his tape and saying that there are more pressing issues at play, like ISIS and foreign threats.

As he’s said before, Trump alleged that Fields touched him twice and questioned if he should even go so far as to press charges against her. He once again posited that she was breaking the rules as the press conference was over and she was still trying to ask questions by dogging him as he left the room.

Trump also called out the Jupiter Police, saying that “what they’ve done is, I think, outrageous.

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A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More

A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More

A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More

A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More

A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More

A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More

A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More

A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More

A Missouri woman believes her constitutional right to farm shields her against being prosecuted for allegedly growing a small crop of marijuana in her basement.
Lisa Loesch, 52, of Jefferson City, was charged in 2013 with a felony count of manufacturing and/or distributing a controlled substance. Investigators with the Jefferson City Police Department and a regional drug task force said they found nine healthy, potted marijuana plants under grow lights in her basement in October 2012.
“The room was set up with grow lights, a CO2 generator, and pots with potting soil,” police said in court records. “The plants were approximately 1 and ½ to 2 feet in height.”
Loesch denied knowledge of the plants, court records say.
Loesch’s lawyer, a public defender named Justin Carver, filed a motion April 28 asking for her case’s dismissal.
Carver argued that growing marijuana is protected by Missouri’s new farming rights amendment, which Missouri voters narrowly passed in an August referendum. Of nearly 1 million votes cast, the amendment passed by a margin of 2,376 votes.
The amendment enshrined the right to farm in the state constitution, saying the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices “shall not be infringed.” It was prompted by rural legislators who said farm culture needed protection from environmentalists and animal-rights activists. Missouri was the second state behind North Dakota to place farming rights in its constitution.
“The amendment prohibits the Legislature from declaring what can and cannot be grown in Missouri,” Carver wrote in his motion for dismissal.
Loesch’s lawyer wrote that state laws that prohibit the cultivation of marijuana violate the state and U.S. constitutions and are “vague in that a reasonable person cannot tell and is not given clear notice as to what is prohibited and what is permitted” by law.
The amendment was passed after Loesch was charged. But her attorney says the language of the amendment makes it clear it is not establishing a new right but clarifying an existing right, so it should apply retroactively to Loesch.
Loesch pleaded not guilty to the drug charge in February 2013.
The case has been continued several times since then. A hearing in the case is set for May 13.
Loesch also has pending misdemeanor charges of driving while intoxicated and assaulting a law enforcement officer. She has previous …Read More