North Dakota Cannabis News

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Police reports: South Dakota residents arrested on drug charges

2:17 pm CDT April 25, 2018

A man and woman from South Dakota face multiple drug charges after being arrested April 13, according to the Will County Sheriff’s Office.

Bruce J. Watson, 56, of 514 Americas Way in Box Elder, S.D, was arrested in the area of Interstate 80 and S. Harlem Avenue and charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession of cannabis over 100 grams and armed
violence.

Spring E. Watson, 60, of the same address, was charged with possession of cannabis over 100 grams and possession of a controlled substance.

April 15

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Today, San Franciscans will take to the streets.

More than a year ago, a coalition of Native Americans, environmentalists and concerned San Franciscans testified before the Board of Supervisors. Many of them experienced brutalities at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota as they protested the Dakota Access Pipeline’s impact on clean drinking water and Native Americans’ rights. They urged San Francisco to divest taxpayers’ money from banks financing the oil pipeline.

The supervisors listened. They directed Treasurer Jose Cisneros to establish a Municipal Bank Feasibility Task Force and to evaluate the creation of a public bank. A public bank could handle taxpayers’ money, provide loans to local businesses, fund affordable housing and ensure San Francisco isn’t complicit in preying upon the vulnerable and destroying the environment.

Last week, task force members began hashing out potential solutions for the bank’s high startup costs. Some believe the budding cannabis industry could give San Francisco the green it needs to break free from Wall Street banks and the harm they’ve caused.

But advocates remain concerned a public bank may still not move forward.

“A public bank in San Francisco is feasible,” Cisneros told me. “The more challenging question: Is it a good policy decision given the complexity, expense and risks?”

Other municipalities haven’t figured out ways to overcome these challenges. Last week, Santa Fe’s task force determined a public bank’s benefits are “at best marginal and at worst would carry risk of non-viability.” The Los Angeles chief legislative analyst called startup costs “exorbitant” in its report last February.

A public bank could require a minimum of $10 million in capital, approximately $1 million in startup costs and about $2 million for staff salaries, as well as additional funds for offices, branches,

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FARGO – A West Fargo man faces felony charges of manslaughter and child neglect in the apparent bathtub drowning of one of his children last month, according to Cass County District Court documents.

Spencer Warren Foner, 27, was arraigned Tuesday, April 24, appearing in court via interactive television from the Cass County Jail, where he’s being held in lieu of $5,000.

According to court documents:

West Fargo police were dispatched March 7 to Foner’s apartment, and officers found him standing over an 8-month-old child who was not breathing. One of the officers immediately began life-saving efforts, and shortly thereafter, an ambulance crew took the child to a local hospital.

The infant later died, and a preliminary autopsy listed the cause of death as drowning, according to an affidavit dated April 13.

While at the apartment, officers saw another child, either 3 or 4 years old, in a bathtub that contained about 8 inches of water.

Officers smelled marijuana and saw marijuana paraphernalia, including pipes and a bong, in multiple areas of the apartment, including areas the toddler could access.

There was also garbage, dirty dishes and soiled diapers found in several places, and one bedroom contained a cat’s scattered litter box.

Initially, Foner told officers that he had not put the 8-month-old in the tub. Later, Foner told a detective that he had put the child in a Bumbo seat, a device that allows children to sit up who cannot yet sit up on their own in the tub. He said he then ran the water to where it just entered the Bumbo seat, took out the drain plug and shut off the water.

Foner said his older child said he

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IF ONLY Richard Nixon could go to China, as the saying goes, then maybe only Republicans can legalize weed.

Marijuana has now been legalized for medical use in many states. Only Idaho, Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota still prohibit its use in any form. Nine states allow recreational marijuana use, and 13 others have decriminalized recreational use to some extent.

Meanwhile, public support for legalizing the drug continues to grow and is now firmly in majority territory.

Unsurprisingly, weed has become big business. Sales in Colorado alone now top $1 billion a year. A study by data analytics firm New Frontier Data recently estimated that if marijuana legalization went national, it could generate more than $10 billion of tax revenue a year.

There’s just one problem: Cannabis is still illegal under federal law.

During the administration of President Barack Obama, an uneasy detente existed, where the federal government agreed not to prosecute marijuana production, sale and use in states where it was legal. That effectively left things up to the states, but still left open the possibility that the federal government might reverse itself and crack down on pot users and growers.

This year, the crackdown came. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that he was rescinding the Obama-era policy of tolerance, and that marijuana users and growers in every state in the union now had to fear arrest and prosecution by the feds.

But Sessions may find himself increasingly isolated, even within his own party.

It’s not just that public opinion has shifted. Unlike in past federal crackdowns, cannabis is now an incumbent industry that fills state coffers and can lobby legislators. U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner, a Republican from

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PRESS RELEASE: SACRAMENTO- AB 3157, introduced by Assemblymembers Tom Lackey (R-Palmdale) and Rob Bonta (D-Oakland), passed the Assembly Committee on Revenue and Taxation with bipartisan support. The bill is aimed at reducing the price disparity between legal cannabis businesses and black market sources.

“Now that voters have enacted Proposition 64, it’s up to us to make the system work,” said Assemblyman Lackey (R-Palmdale). “We have a choice to make. We can either support the legal, regulated market or we can continue to see this activity occur through illegal channels.”

“California cannabis businesses are making significant investments as they embrace the regulated marketplace while, at the same time, being undercut by unregulated competitors,” said Assemblymember Rob Bonta (D-Oakland). “AB 3157 reduces the tax burden on the licensed cannabis market during this transition period, keeping customers at licensed stores and helping ensure the regulated market survives and thrives.”

AB 3157 will suspend the state’s cultivation tax which currently charges a flat tax of $148 per pound. It will also reduce the state’s excise tax from 15% to 11%. Both tax reductions are temporary and would sunset in June 2021 after California’s regulated market has had time to mature. The current tax structure places licensed businesses at a significant disadvantage to illegal retailers and black market sources.

The Fitch credit rating agency estimates that the current cumulative tax rate in California is as high as 45%. Other states with legal adult-use like Washington and Oregon have successfully taken steps to reduce their tax rates and encourage the adoption of the legal market. Local jurisdictions are also taking steps to reduce their tax rates including the City of Berkeley which lowered its local tax from 10% to 5%.

“By lowering the excise tax and postponing the cultivation tax it will lower the overall price for consumers at

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BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota’s Health Department will review 19 applications from potential manufacturers of medical cannabis.

Medical Marijuana Division Director Jason Wahl says that’s the number of applications that were submitted prior to the deadline Monday, April 23, 2018. A seven-member panel made up of health officials, citizens, law enforcement officials and a state lawyer will begin examining the applications. Applicants had to submit a $5,000 nonrefundable fee.

The state will register two manufacturers.

State officials have been developing the medical cannabis system since legislators crafted a law a year ago. That followed voters’ approval of the drug on November 8, 2016, when Initiated Statutory Measure 5 received 63.8 percent approval.

Wahl says medical cannabis should be available in North Dakota by the end of the year.

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Proponents of legalizing recreational marijuana use are about 2,500 signatures away from requirements for a measure to be placed on the November ballot.

The measure needs 13,452 valid, qualified signatures to go to a vote, according to the North Dakota Secretary of State’s office.

The petition calls for full legalization for those older than the age of 21 to use, possess, grow and distribute for any purpose, said David Owen, sponsoring committee chair. This includes natural oils and products made from the plant. And the proposal sets no limits on how much producers can grow.

It also says anyone previously convicted of a marijuana-related crime would have their records expunged 30 days after the measure’s passage or after being released from prison.

Owen said members of his group has until early July to submit signatures. They expect to have 16,000 to 20,000 signers by then. 

North Dakota voters approved marijuana for medical purposes last year but a full legalization effort failed to gather enough signatures. Owen said he thinks the statewide voter approval of medical marijuana, along with an organized staff running the current petition campaign, are what could contribute to success this time around.

The delay in implementation of medical marijuana is another factor.

“The fact is people still can’t get their medicine,” he said, adding that this petition, if voted into law, would fix that.

Owen said the petition treats marijuana as if it were alcohol in the sense that there are age limits and laws against driving high.

“It’s a big deal to tax revenue,” Owen said.

Using conservative estimates, his group expects growing could result in $24,000 per acre in tax revenue from sales and

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The Fargo Police celebrated 420 last weekend by setting up a cannabis sting on Twitter. Last Friday, the police department’s official Twitter account tweeted a trap disguised as a cannabis prize.

‘Since today is 4/20, we are giving away prizes to the person that has the most marijuana,” the tweet read. “If you think you have more marijuana than anyone else, and you want to enter this contest, come by and show us at 222 4 St. N.” 

While medical marijuana is legal in North Dakota, recreational cannabis remains prohibited. So anyone who turned up to claim their ‘prize’ at the police station was liable to get charged with a drug offense.

And the Fargo police weren’t the only ones releasing special 420 tweets this year. Police in Lawrence, Kansas cracked some stereotypical stoner jokes through their Twitter account on Friday.

“Hey potheads planning to toke up on 4/20, stay off the road. Stock up on Cheetos and Mt. Dew BEFORE you spark. Saturation patrols to find drugged drivers to occur,” they tweeted.

While drug impaired driving is a real issue and should be taken seriously, it’s also important for police in Lawrence and across the country to address the issue without insulting cannabis consumers and rehashing old and untrue stereotypes about people who smoke marijuana.

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If only Nixon could go to China, as the saying goes, then maybe only Republicans can legalize weed.

Marijuana has now been legalized for medical use in many states; only Idaho, Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota still prohibit use in any form. Nine states allow recreational marijuana use, and 13 others have decriminalized recreational use to some extent. Meanwhile, public support for legalizing the drug continues to grow and is now firmly in majority territory.

Unsurprisingly, weed has become big business — sales in Colorado alone now top $1 billion a year. A study by data analytics firm New Frontier Data recently estimated that if marijuana legalization went national, it could generate more than $10 billion of tax revenue a year.

There’s just one problem: Cannabis is still illegal under federal law. During the administration of President Barack Obama, an uneasy détente existed in which the federal government agreed not to prosecute marijuana production, sale and use in states where it was legal. That effectively left things up to the states, but left open the possibility that the federal government might reverse itself and crack down. This year, the crackdown came. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that he was rescinding the Obama-era policy of tolerance, and that marijuana users and growers in every state in the union now had to fear arrest and prosecution by the feds.

But Sessions may find himself increasingly isolated, even within his own party. It’s not just that public opinion has shifted. Unlike in past federal crackdowns, cannabis is now an incumbent industry that fills state coffers and can lobby legislators. Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., had threatened to block Justice Department nominees unless Sessions backed off. President Donald Trump appeared to concede, assuring the senator that there would be no punishment for Colorado. Meanwhile,

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