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Sativex, the cannabis oral spray, has been chosen to be used in an upcoming study in treating an aggressive type of cancer known as glioblastoma.

The Brain Tumour Charity, an organization that seeks to increase research to find cures for brain tumors, is asking to raise £450,000 to fund the Sativex trial, which will be led by Professor Susan Short of Leeds University. 

“We think that Sativex may kill glioblastoma tumour cells, and that it may be particularly effective when given with temozolomide chemotherapy,” she said. “…so it may enhance the effects of chemotherapy treatment in stopping these tumours growing, allowing patients to live longer. That is what we want to test in the study.” 

The study will include the recruitment of 232 patients in early 2022 chosen from approximately 15 different hospitals and cancer centers in the United Kingdom. To study Sativex’s effectiveness, researchers will administer two-thirds of the patients with Sativex, and the remaining one-third with a placebo.

Approved by the United Kingdom National Health Service (NHS) in 2009, Sativex contains both THC and CBD, and, using the entourage effect, has proven to be a potent medicine. It is already used for patients with multiple sclerosis. The medicine is known for its ability

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Barcelona is still fighting to try and keep their legacy cannabis clubs open, despite a recent blow from the Supreme court. 

The battle over recreational cannabis is entering a new phase in Spain right now. Last week, the Supreme Court closed the loophole in federal law created by municipal officials in Barcelona, which allows the cannabis clubs a legal space in which to operate.

Namely, the judges ruled that city officials, who have supported the clubs so far, are not competent to legislate on such matters. Since most cannabis clubs in Spain are in Barcelona, this decision is a gauntlet thrown, and from a high level, on the entire discussion.

If this happened in the United States, it would essentially be like the city of Denver facing down the federal government on, say, selling cannabis without the protection of a state vote to change the constitution and a Cole memo, albeit with a few less SWAT teams. 

The fact is that Catalonia, the Spanish state in which Barcelona is located, has a longstanding separatist tendency, which is why the city has long given a pass to the existence of the clubs.

But it is not just city officials who have come out in support of

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Sharon Bentley is, in the lingo of her country, a “sheila” who is also on a green mission she is passionately pursuing with a dedication that has seen her not only create a company but has begun to shape the Australian domestic market. Medical Cannabis Australia, the company she founded, just obtained its cultivation and manufacture licenses from the Office of Drug Control (ODC) in April of this year.

The daughter of two immigrants to Australia (her mother is from Liverpool, and her father is from a small village north of Lebanon), Bentley grew as one of six children up in a small country village in New South Wales with a population of less than 100 people. She traveled 170 kilometers a day by bus to school and back.

After graduating from high school, she moved to Sydney and started a career in the legal industry as a paralegal. After a few years of working in the legal industry, with the original goal of becoming a lawyer, she left the industry because, in her words, “it wasn’t exciting and thrilling enough.” She moved into the television business with a major Australian network where she quickly was promoted into the position of National

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In April, we wrote about the Facebook v. Duguid ruling issued by the Supreme Court was likely going to gut a great number of TCPA cases pending across the United States, some of which involve cannabis companies. As a quick recap, the Supreme Court had narrowed the definition of the “automatic telephone dialing system” (“ATDS”) to only those devices that generate random or sequential phone numbers (which are now largely obsolete). Since most TCPA cases have been filed against companies who use a database of phone numbers instead of phone numbers that are truly randomly generated, we’ve seen the lower courts follow suit and dismiss those cases that don’t plead the proper definition of an ATDS.

Well, we also wrote this was probably not the end of TCPA litigation as a whole, and a new lawsuit filed against a California dispensary proves it. In Pettibone v. City Compassionate Caregivers (“CCC”), a class action lawsuit filed in the Central District of California, Pettibone alleges that CCC sent multiple telemarketing messages to her cell phone that included opt-out instructions (“Text STOP to unsubscribe”). On November 14, 2020, Pettibone did reply with a STOP – but CCC continued to send her messages.

Instead

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Massachusetts, get ready for your very own, first-ever People’s Choice Cannabis Cup, coming this year. Known as a hotbed and safe haven for cannabis in New England, the Massachusetts industry is coming back stronger than ever after the COVID shutdown and is getting ready for this groundbreaking competition. If you want to know how to get involved, as well as why this Cup is one to mark your calendar for, look no further. 

This year, to keep things safe and compliant, the competition will feature a digital awards show only. Judging is done from home, and there is no live event. And there’s good news—judging is open to everyone who is eligible to purchase cannabis in the state!

The High Times Cannabis Cup Massachusetts: People’s Choice Edition is aimed to identify and award the best cannabis products in all of Massachusetts, all across a wide range of different categories, which are to be judged by the great people of Massachusetts for the state’s premiere Cannabis Cup.

Yes, you read that right. All the selections will be made by the people, so that Massachusetts can truly claim the most worthy winners of the top cannabis across the state. 

May the best products win!

Cannabis Cup Submissions and

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Republican lawmakers in Washington, D.C. have introduced legislation that would ban the spending of federal welfare benefits at cannabis dispensaries. Two pending pieces of legislation include language to prohibit the use of welfare benefits at marijuana retailers, including a wide-reaching Senate welfare reform bill and a stand-alone measure in the House of Representatives.

In the Senate, Republican Senator Steve Daines of Montana has included the ban in a welfare reform bill known as the “Jobs and Opportunity with Benefits and Services Act” or “JOBS Act,” (S.2381), which he introduced in the upper chamber of Congress on July 19.

The bill contains several reforms to the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, including provisions that provide job search assistance and others that require benefit recipients to work or actively seek employment. Also included in the JOBS Act is a section titled “Welfare for needs not weed,” a provision that bars the use of TANF funds at “any establishment that offers marihuana … for sale.”

“Finding and keeping a job is the best way for Montana families to go from government dependency to self-sufficiency,” Daines said in a statement on the legislation, which did not mention the cannabis provisions of the measure. “My

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A recent lawsuit filed against the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority (OMMA) claims that the organization did not make its meeting agenda available to the public, which violated a state law known as the Oklahoma Open Meeting Act.

The lawsuit is led by Tulsa-based attorney Ron Durbin of Durbin Law – Viridian, who spoke at a rally at the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City on July 30. “One of the main reasons I’m here today is, we filed a new lawsuit against the OMMA, against Director Williams, against her secretary, against a lot of the new members of the board of health and the food safety standard board,” Durbin said.

Approximately 100 people attended the rally, according to Fox 25. “We don’t want to do this; this is ridiculous that we have to continue to do this stuff, but if they keep forcing our hand, we’re going to keep doing it.”

Oklahoma Being Sued for “Sneaky” Rule-making

The lawsuit claims that new, emergency rules for the industry, which went into effect on July 1, were agreed upon without making the community properly aware.

The lawsuit states that the OMMA violated the Oklahoma Open Meeting Act, which requires that all state meetings (such as local boards, commissions and

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Louisiana ended the punishment of jail time for possession of small amounts of recreational cannabis, which took effect Sunday. It was one of more than 250 new laws that took effect on the same day, including new requirements for doctors administering the abortion pill and restrictions on when police officers can use chokehold restraints.

That means people in Louisiana caught with small amounts of recreational cannabis will only face a fine—with no possibility of heading to jail. The new law makes possession of up to 14 grams of pot only a misdemeanor crime carrying a fine up to $100, even for repeat offenses.

The decriminalization effort there is long overdue. Several municipalities in the Louisiana area already had switched to fines instead of arrests for possession of small amounts of cannabis.

Louisiana Progress is a partnership between two organizations—Coalition for Louisiana Progress and Louisiana Progress Action Fund. The group was created to be a powerful statewide network focusing on supporting individuals, allies, advocates, organizations and elected officials who want to move an agenda built around more just and equitable systems in the state.

“Marijuana decriminalization will truly make a difference in the lives of the people of our state,” said Peter Robins-Brown, policy &

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On July 22, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (“LCB”) issued a notice of adoption of an interpretive statement (the “Notice”) in which the agency clarified authorized practices for marijuana processor licensees. The Notice stipulates that licensed marijuana processors cannot legally convert cannabidiol (“CBD”) into delta-9 THC because their license privileges do not allow them to manufacture THC.

Specifically, the LCB explains that:

Licensed marijuana producer may produce “marijuana” products exceeding 0.3 percent THC concentration on a dry weight basis and are authorized by statute to source “marijuana” from licensed “marijuana” producers only; The statutory language does not authorize a licensed processor to source hemp-based product, such as legally derived CBD, and convert it to delta-9 THC; The process of conversion is not an identified privilege afforded to license marijuana processors; and RCW 69.50.326 enables licensed processors to source CBD products, whether from inside or outside the regulated system, for the purpose of enhancing the CBD concentration of marijuana and marijuana products. Yet, it does not address or affirmatively authorize the use of other isomers or derivatives of marijuana as additives to marijuana and marijuana products, nor does it authorize licensed processors to process other isomers or derivatives

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CANNABIS CULTURE – The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) is investing $2 million to address research gaps in the effects of cannabis on mental health among diverse populations of Canada.

“To gain a clear understanding of the mental health impacts of cannabis use in Canada, we must include representations from all areas of the population—particularly from those communities who are frequently overlooked in research,” said MHCC president and CEO Michel Rodrigue.

In total there are 18 research projects to address research gaps in the impacts of cannabis for individuals with a history of trauma, cannabis use among individuals with substance use disorders who identify as 2SLGBTQ+, and improved pathways to care for young people in racialized and Indigenous communities with emerging psychosis.

“I think it’s fair to say that the [MHCC] research on cannabis and mental health is making a really unique contribution because it’s so focused on the needs of diverse populations,” says Dr. Mary Bartram, MHCC Director of Mental Health and Substance Use. “And because it’s been really guided by what we call lived—and sometimes living—experience of cannabis and mental health. And that’s a core principle of the [MHCC] and, frankly the mental health and substance abuse

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